The Zone of Tolerance and its effects on the hiring of school principals.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184899
Title:
The Zone of Tolerance and its effects on the hiring of school principals.
Author:
Voorhis, George William.
Issue Date:
1989
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The Zone of Tolerance is a concept which describes the latitude of control that a community gives to its professional educators. Current research which attempts to delineate this zone indicates that community control of a district will vary, but is predictable when variables are arranged to meet certain criteria. Specifically, William Boyd (1976) concluded in a summary of the research that in large heterogeneous urban districts professional interests will dominate in routine internal issues such as personnel. This study used multiple qualitative methods to examine Boyd's contention by analyzing the hiring of successful principal candidates in a large heterogeneous school district. Interviews were conducted with principals selected by questionnaires and hired in the district during the period of time from 1975 to 1985. Corresponding data about school district events for the period were also collected from newspapers and other public archives. In addition, principals' perceptions of legitimacy affected by changes in influence on the hiring process were gathered. Data were then reduced, categorized and analyzed on the basis of shifting patterns of community and professional dominance. Results indicated that an increase in minority rights issues and the community's changing demographics shifted control of the hiring process from the school professionals to a newly elected school board more representative of community interests. Principals' perceptions of legitimacy affected by the changing patterns of dominance were varied and inconclusive, however the shift in control over personnel decisions regarding the hiring of principals was conclusive and contradicted Boyd's contention.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
School principals.; Schools -- Public relations.; School personnel management.; Home and school.
Degree Name:
Ed.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Educational Foundations and Administration; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Grant, Robert T.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe Zone of Tolerance and its effects on the hiring of school principals.en_US
dc.creatorVoorhis, George William.en_US
dc.contributor.authorVoorhis, George William.en_US
dc.date.issued1989en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe Zone of Tolerance is a concept which describes the latitude of control that a community gives to its professional educators. Current research which attempts to delineate this zone indicates that community control of a district will vary, but is predictable when variables are arranged to meet certain criteria. Specifically, William Boyd (1976) concluded in a summary of the research that in large heterogeneous urban districts professional interests will dominate in routine internal issues such as personnel. This study used multiple qualitative methods to examine Boyd's contention by analyzing the hiring of successful principal candidates in a large heterogeneous school district. Interviews were conducted with principals selected by questionnaires and hired in the district during the period of time from 1975 to 1985. Corresponding data about school district events for the period were also collected from newspapers and other public archives. In addition, principals' perceptions of legitimacy affected by changes in influence on the hiring process were gathered. Data were then reduced, categorized and analyzed on the basis of shifting patterns of community and professional dominance. Results indicated that an increase in minority rights issues and the community's changing demographics shifted control of the hiring process from the school professionals to a newly elected school board more representative of community interests. Principals' perceptions of legitimacy affected by the changing patterns of dominance were varied and inconclusive, however the shift in control over personnel decisions regarding the hiring of principals was conclusive and contradicted Boyd's contention.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectSchool principals.en_US
dc.subjectSchools -- Public relations.en_US
dc.subjectSchool personnel management.en_US
dc.subjectHome and school.en_US
thesis.degree.nameEd.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Foundations and Administrationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorGrant, Robert T.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSacken, Donal M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberConley, Sharonen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9013160en_US
dc.identifier.oclc703432433en_US
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