The genomic organization and right early transcription of bacteriophage PRD1.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184884
Title:
The genomic organization and right early transcription of bacteriophage PRD1.
Author:
Gerendasy, Dan Douglas.
Issue Date:
1989
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The bacteriophage PRD1 is a lipid bearing phage that infects a wide variety of gram-negative bacteria, including Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium when they harbor the appropriate plasmid. It contains a linear duplex DNA molecule that is covalently bound by its 5' ends to a terminal protein. Like adenovirus and the Bacillus phage φ29, PRD1 specifies its own DNA polymerase which is able to utilize the phage encoded terminal protein to prime DNA synthesis. In addition to these two proteins, PRD1 also specifies an additional replication protein (p12) of unknown function. We have sequenced the origins of replication (termini of the genome) as well as the right most 1700 bp of the bacteriophage PRD1 genome. The right most 1700 bp encompasses the right early region and completes the sequence of all PRD1 early functions. We report here that the PRD1 genome contains a perfect 111 bp inverted terminal repeat. Furthermore, statistical analyses of the right 1700 bp, as well as the examination of transcription and translation signals has allowed us to assign gene XII to an open reading frame and to infer the direction of both early and late transcription. Gene XII, which has been implicated in the replication process and the regulation of gene expression is predicted to encode a 16.7 Kdal protein. Data base searches have revealed a possible evolutionary relationship between this protein and the ε-subunit of E. coli DNA polymerase III. We have also mapped right, early transcription of the PRD1 genome. This has corroborated our inference concerning the direction of right early transcription and confirmed our assignment of gene XII to an open reading frame. It has also revealed that two putative rho-independent terminators are functional in vitro and that the putative right early promoter is utilized in vivo and in vitro. The data presented here have permitted us to ascertain the general genomic and transcriptional organization of PRD1 and to predict the primary structure of the product of gene XII. These results, in turn, have allowed us to develop hypotheses concerning the evolution of linear, protein primed DNA's and the function of gene XII.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Bacteriophages -- Genetics; DNA polymerases -- Analysis
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Molecular and Cellular Biology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Ito, Junetsu

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe genomic organization and right early transcription of bacteriophage PRD1.en_US
dc.creatorGerendasy, Dan Douglas.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGerendasy, Dan Douglas.en_US
dc.date.issued1989en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe bacteriophage PRD1 is a lipid bearing phage that infects a wide variety of gram-negative bacteria, including Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium when they harbor the appropriate plasmid. It contains a linear duplex DNA molecule that is covalently bound by its 5' ends to a terminal protein. Like adenovirus and the Bacillus phage φ29, PRD1 specifies its own DNA polymerase which is able to utilize the phage encoded terminal protein to prime DNA synthesis. In addition to these two proteins, PRD1 also specifies an additional replication protein (p12) of unknown function. We have sequenced the origins of replication (termini of the genome) as well as the right most 1700 bp of the bacteriophage PRD1 genome. The right most 1700 bp encompasses the right early region and completes the sequence of all PRD1 early functions. We report here that the PRD1 genome contains a perfect 111 bp inverted terminal repeat. Furthermore, statistical analyses of the right 1700 bp, as well as the examination of transcription and translation signals has allowed us to assign gene XII to an open reading frame and to infer the direction of both early and late transcription. Gene XII, which has been implicated in the replication process and the regulation of gene expression is predicted to encode a 16.7 Kdal protein. Data base searches have revealed a possible evolutionary relationship between this protein and the ε-subunit of E. coli DNA polymerase III. We have also mapped right, early transcription of the PRD1 genome. This has corroborated our inference concerning the direction of right early transcription and confirmed our assignment of gene XII to an open reading frame. It has also revealed that two putative rho-independent terminators are functional in vitro and that the putative right early promoter is utilized in vivo and in vitro. The data presented here have permitted us to ascertain the general genomic and transcriptional organization of PRD1 and to predict the primary structure of the product of gene XII. These results, in turn, have allowed us to develop hypotheses concerning the evolution of linear, protein primed DNA's and the function of gene XII.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBacteriophages -- Geneticsen_US
dc.subjectDNA polymerases -- Analysisen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMolecular and Cellular Biologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorIto, Junetsuen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBernstein, Dr. Harrisen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDuffy, Dr. Johnen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLindell, Dr. Thomasen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSpizizen, Dr. Johnen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9013145en_US
dc.identifier.oclc703433973en_US
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