Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184883
Title:
Genetic models of two-phenotype frequency-dependent selection.
Author:
Gayley, Todd Warwick
Issue Date:
1989
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The aim of this study is to place a wide variety of two-phenotype frequency-dependent selection models into a unified population-genetic framework. This work is used to illuminate the possible genetic constraints that may exist in such models, and to address the question of evolutionary modification of these constraints. The first part of Chapter 1 synthesizes from the literature a general framework for applying a genetic structure to a simple class of two-phenotype models. It shows that genetic constraints may prevent the population from achieving a predicted phenotypic equilibrium, but the population will equilibrate at a point that is as close as possible to the phenotypic equilibrium. The second part of Chapter 1 goes on to ask whether evolutionary modification of the genetic system might be expected to remove these constraints. Chapter 2 provides an example of the application of the framework developed in Chapter 1. It presents re-analysis of a model for the evolution of social behavior by reciprocation (Brown et al. 1982). The genetic results of Chapter 1 apply to this model without modification. I show that Brown et al. were unnecessarily restrictive in their assumptions about the types of genetic systems that support their conclusions. Chapter 3 discusses some models for the evolution of altruism that do not fit the assumptions of Chapter 1, despite their two-phenotype structure. These models violate the fundamental assumption of Chapter 1, this being the way in which individual fitness is derived from the behavioral fitnesses. The first part is a complete, in-depth analysis of diploid sib-sib kin selection. I show that some results from the basic model can be used, provided the behavioral inclusive fitness functions are substituted for the true behavioral fitnesses. The second part is an analysis of the validity of the concept of behavioral structure, as introduced by Michod and Sanderson (1985). I show that this concept is flawed as a general principle. Chapter 4 extends the basic model to the case of sex-allocation evolution. I show how many of the central results of sex-allocation theory can be derived more simply using a two-phenotype framework.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Population genetics -- Mathematical models; Sociobiology -- Mathematical models; Behavior evolution; Behavior genetics; Group selection (Evolution)
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Ecology and Evolutionary Biology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Michod, Richard

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleGenetic models of two-phenotype frequency-dependent selection.en_US
dc.creatorGayley, Todd Warwicken_US
dc.contributor.authorGayley, Todd Warwicken_US
dc.date.issued1989en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe aim of this study is to place a wide variety of two-phenotype frequency-dependent selection models into a unified population-genetic framework. This work is used to illuminate the possible genetic constraints that may exist in such models, and to address the question of evolutionary modification of these constraints. The first part of Chapter 1 synthesizes from the literature a general framework for applying a genetic structure to a simple class of two-phenotype models. It shows that genetic constraints may prevent the population from achieving a predicted phenotypic equilibrium, but the population will equilibrate at a point that is as close as possible to the phenotypic equilibrium. The second part of Chapter 1 goes on to ask whether evolutionary modification of the genetic system might be expected to remove these constraints. Chapter 2 provides an example of the application of the framework developed in Chapter 1. It presents re-analysis of a model for the evolution of social behavior by reciprocation (Brown et al. 1982). The genetic results of Chapter 1 apply to this model without modification. I show that Brown et al. were unnecessarily restrictive in their assumptions about the types of genetic systems that support their conclusions. Chapter 3 discusses some models for the evolution of altruism that do not fit the assumptions of Chapter 1, despite their two-phenotype structure. These models violate the fundamental assumption of Chapter 1, this being the way in which individual fitness is derived from the behavioral fitnesses. The first part is a complete, in-depth analysis of diploid sib-sib kin selection. I show that some results from the basic model can be used, provided the behavioral inclusive fitness functions are substituted for the true behavioral fitnesses. The second part is an analysis of the validity of the concept of behavioral structure, as introduced by Michod and Sanderson (1985). I show that this concept is flawed as a general principle. Chapter 4 extends the basic model to the case of sex-allocation evolution. I show how many of the central results of sex-allocation theory can be derived more simply using a two-phenotype framework.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPopulation genetics -- Mathematical modelsen_US
dc.subjectSociobiology -- Mathematical modelsen_US
dc.subjectBehavior evolutionen_US
dc.subjectBehavior geneticsen_US
dc.subjectGroup selection (Evolution)en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEcology and Evolutionary Biologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMichod, Richarden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberIstock, Conraden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKidwell, Margareten_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWalsh, J. Bruceen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAbugov, Robert Jonen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9013144en_US
dc.identifier.oclc703434728en_US
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