The effectiveness of NEWSGAME as an educational tool in the teaching of current events.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184869
Title:
The effectiveness of NEWSGAME as an educational tool in the teaching of current events.
Author:
Zakrasek, Mary Margaret.
Issue Date:
1989
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to determine if an educational tool such as NEWSGAME affects students' learning about current events. To determine the effectiveness of this game, an end-of-year post-test was given to the following groups: (1) students that played NEWSGAME regularly; (2) students that played NEWSGAME occasionally; (3) students that never played NEWSGAME. In addition, demographic data such as age and sex was analyzed to determine if differences in knowledge of various current event categories existed among these groups. A survey measuring students' opinion of NEWSGAME was also collected. This study involved the participation of 350 students in 11 social studies classrooms. Of the total sample, there were 183 males and 157 females. Ten cases were not identified. The students ranged in age from 11 to 19 with the majority being 12-15 year-olds. Instrumentation consisted of a Current Events Questionnaire composed of 81 questions covering 14 areas of international, national and state issues. These consisted of multiple choice and fill-in-the-blank statements. The data analysis indicated that students who played NEWSGAME regularly scored higher than those who played occasionally. Those who played NEWSGAME occasionally scored higher than those who never played NEWSGAME. Males were found to score higher than females whether NEWSGAME was played regularly or in the occasional/none category. Students over the age of 14 who played regularly scored higher than students under the age of 14. An unusual finding was that students under the age of 14 who played occasionally or not at all scored better than students over age 14 who played occasionally or not at all. Overall, it can be concluded that the NEWSGAME experience was most beneficial for males who were older than 14 who played the game regularly. In response to the question whether students liked or disliked NEWSGAME, 91% indicated they liked this educational tool.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Current events.; Educational games.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Teaching and Teacher Education; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
McMahon, Jacqueline

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe effectiveness of NEWSGAME as an educational tool in the teaching of current events.en_US
dc.creatorZakrasek, Mary Margaret.en_US
dc.contributor.authorZakrasek, Mary Margaret.en_US
dc.date.issued1989en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to determine if an educational tool such as NEWSGAME affects students' learning about current events. To determine the effectiveness of this game, an end-of-year post-test was given to the following groups: (1) students that played NEWSGAME regularly; (2) students that played NEWSGAME occasionally; (3) students that never played NEWSGAME. In addition, demographic data such as age and sex was analyzed to determine if differences in knowledge of various current event categories existed among these groups. A survey measuring students' opinion of NEWSGAME was also collected. This study involved the participation of 350 students in 11 social studies classrooms. Of the total sample, there were 183 males and 157 females. Ten cases were not identified. The students ranged in age from 11 to 19 with the majority being 12-15 year-olds. Instrumentation consisted of a Current Events Questionnaire composed of 81 questions covering 14 areas of international, national and state issues. These consisted of multiple choice and fill-in-the-blank statements. The data analysis indicated that students who played NEWSGAME regularly scored higher than those who played occasionally. Those who played NEWSGAME occasionally scored higher than those who never played NEWSGAME. Males were found to score higher than females whether NEWSGAME was played regularly or in the occasional/none category. Students over the age of 14 who played regularly scored higher than students under the age of 14. An unusual finding was that students under the age of 14 who played occasionally or not at all scored better than students over age 14 who played occasionally or not at all. Overall, it can be concluded that the NEWSGAME experience was most beneficial for males who were older than 14 who played the game regularly. In response to the question whether students liked or disliked NEWSGAME, 91% indicated they liked this educational tool.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectCurrent events.en_US
dc.subjectEducational games.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineTeaching and Teacher Educationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMcMahon, Jacquelineen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPate, Glennen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberClark, Donen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9010488en_US
dc.identifier.oclc703424651en_US
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