Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184852
Title:
Three-dimensional hyperthermia cancer treatment simulation.
Author:
Chen, Zong-Ping.
Issue Date:
1989
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
A simulation program to study the three dimensional temperature distributions produced by hyperthermia in anatomically realistic inhomogeneous tissue models has been developed. The anatomical data for the inhomogeneous tissues of the human body are entered on a digitizing tablet from serial CT scans. The program not only predicts temperature distributions in regions dominated by blood perfusion (with large number of small capillaries), but it can also predict the temperatures inside of and at the vicinity of large blood vessels. The program can be used for different power deposition patterns from various heating modalities, but they must be calculated independently. In this study, the author's attention has been focused on ferromagnetic implants. The program has been used to comparatively evaluate two and three dimensional simulations in a series of parametric calculations based on simple tissue models for both uniform power deposition and ferromagnetic implants. The conclusions drawn from these studies are that two dimensional simulations can lead to significant errors in many situations, and therefore three dimensional simulations will be necessary for accurate patient treatment planning. The conclusion from the geometrically simple model is substantiated by the results obtained using the full 3D model for actual patient anatomical simulations. The program has also been used for several parametric studies. The effect of the thermal conductivity used in the models on the temperature field has been studied, and the results show that its value in the range of 0.4 to 0.6 W/m/°C (valid for most soft tissues) has only a slight effect on the resultant temperature fields. The heating ability of the ferromagnetic implants has also been investigated for different blood perfusions. The effects of the Curie point of the ferromagnetic seeds, and seed spacing are also studied. Finally, the impact of large blood vessels on the resultant temperatures are studied, and the results show that the effect is dramatic and therefore it must be included in the simulations in order to predict accurate temperature fields. Finally, the program has been used to analyze a previously performed dog experiment, and a previously performed clinical treatment. A comparison between the predicted temperatures and the measured ones show that good agreement has been achieved for the clinical treatment, but not for the dog experiment. These results are studied in detail, and the conditions under which this program can be used as a hyperthermia patient treatment planning tool is discussed.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Cancer -- Thermotherapy.; Heat -- Physiological effect.; Heat -- Transmission -- Mathematical models.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Roemer, R. B.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThree-dimensional hyperthermia cancer treatment simulation.en_US
dc.creatorChen, Zong-Ping.en_US
dc.contributor.authorChen, Zong-Ping.en_US
dc.date.issued1989en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractA simulation program to study the three dimensional temperature distributions produced by hyperthermia in anatomically realistic inhomogeneous tissue models has been developed. The anatomical data for the inhomogeneous tissues of the human body are entered on a digitizing tablet from serial CT scans. The program not only predicts temperature distributions in regions dominated by blood perfusion (with large number of small capillaries), but it can also predict the temperatures inside of and at the vicinity of large blood vessels. The program can be used for different power deposition patterns from various heating modalities, but they must be calculated independently. In this study, the author's attention has been focused on ferromagnetic implants. The program has been used to comparatively evaluate two and three dimensional simulations in a series of parametric calculations based on simple tissue models for both uniform power deposition and ferromagnetic implants. The conclusions drawn from these studies are that two dimensional simulations can lead to significant errors in many situations, and therefore three dimensional simulations will be necessary for accurate patient treatment planning. The conclusion from the geometrically simple model is substantiated by the results obtained using the full 3D model for actual patient anatomical simulations. The program has also been used for several parametric studies. The effect of the thermal conductivity used in the models on the temperature field has been studied, and the results show that its value in the range of 0.4 to 0.6 W/m/°C (valid for most soft tissues) has only a slight effect on the resultant temperature fields. The heating ability of the ferromagnetic implants has also been investigated for different blood perfusions. The effects of the Curie point of the ferromagnetic seeds, and seed spacing are also studied. Finally, the impact of large blood vessels on the resultant temperatures are studied, and the results show that the effect is dramatic and therefore it must be included in the simulations in order to predict accurate temperature fields. Finally, the program has been used to analyze a previously performed dog experiment, and a previously performed clinical treatment. A comparison between the predicted temperatures and the measured ones show that good agreement has been achieved for the clinical treatment, but not for the dog experiment. These results are studied in detail, and the conditions under which this program can be used as a hyperthermia patient treatment planning tool is discussed.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectCancer -- Thermotherapy.en_US
dc.subjectHeat -- Physiological effect.en_US
dc.subjectHeat -- Transmission -- Mathematical models.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAerospace and Mechanical Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorRoemer, R. B.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCetas, T. C.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberOrtega, A.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9010473en_US
dc.identifier.oclc703424681en_US
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