Nonlinear multiphasic mechanics of soft tissue using finite element methods.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184837
Title:
Nonlinear multiphasic mechanics of soft tissue using finite element methods.
Author:
Gaballa, Mohamed Abdelrhman Ahmed.
Issue Date:
1989
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of the research was to develop a quantitative method which could be used to obtain a clearer understanding of the time-dependent fluid filteration and load-deformation behavior of soft, porous, fluid filled materials (e.g. biological tissues, soil). The focus of the study was on the development of a finite strain theory for multiphasic media and associated computer models capable of predicting the mechanical stresses and the fluid transport processes in porous structures (e.g. across the large blood vessels walls). The finite element (FE) formulation of the nonlinear governing equations of motion was the method of solution for a poroelastic (PE) media. This theory and the FE formulations included the anisotropic, nonlinear material; geometric nonlinearity; compressibility and incompressibility conditions; static and dynamic analysis; and the effect of chemical potential difference across the boundaries (known as swelling effect in biological tissues). The theory takes into account the presence and motion of free water within the biological tissue as the structure undergoes finite straining. Since it is well known that biological tissues are capable of undergoing large deformations, the linear theories are unsatisfactory in describing the mechanical response of these tissues. However, some linear analyses are done in this work to help understand the more involved nonlinear behavior. The PE view allows a quantitative prediction of the mechanical response and specifically the pore pressure fluid flow which may be related to the transport of the macromolecules and other solutes in the biological tissues. A special mechanical analysis was performed on a representative arterial walls in order to investigate the effects of nonlinearity on the fluid flow across the walls. Based on a finite strain poroelastic theory developed in this work; axisymmetric, plane strain FE models were developed to study the quasi-static behavior of large arteries. The accuracy of the FE models was verified by comparison with analytical solutions wherever is possible. These numerical models were used to evaluate variables and parameters, that are difficult or may be impossible to measure experimentally. For instance, pore pressure distribution within the tissue, relative fluid flow; deformation of the wall; and stress distribution across the wall were obtained using the poroelastic FE models. The effect of hypertension on the mechanical response of the arterial wall was studied using the nonlinear finite element models. This study demonstrated that the finite element models are powerful tools for the study of the mechanics of complicated structures such as biological tissue. It is also shown that the nonlinear multiphasic theory, developed in this thesis, is valid for describing the mechanical response of biological tissue structures under mechanical loadings.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Porous materials -- Mathematical models.; Arteries -- Mathematical models.; Deformations (Mechanics); Multiphase flow.; Finite element method.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Simon, B. R.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleNonlinear multiphasic mechanics of soft tissue using finite element methods.en_US
dc.creatorGaballa, Mohamed Abdelrhman Ahmed.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGaballa, Mohamed Abdelrhman Ahmed.en_US
dc.date.issued1989en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of the research was to develop a quantitative method which could be used to obtain a clearer understanding of the time-dependent fluid filteration and load-deformation behavior of soft, porous, fluid filled materials (e.g. biological tissues, soil). The focus of the study was on the development of a finite strain theory for multiphasic media and associated computer models capable of predicting the mechanical stresses and the fluid transport processes in porous structures (e.g. across the large blood vessels walls). The finite element (FE) formulation of the nonlinear governing equations of motion was the method of solution for a poroelastic (PE) media. This theory and the FE formulations included the anisotropic, nonlinear material; geometric nonlinearity; compressibility and incompressibility conditions; static and dynamic analysis; and the effect of chemical potential difference across the boundaries (known as swelling effect in biological tissues). The theory takes into account the presence and motion of free water within the biological tissue as the structure undergoes finite straining. Since it is well known that biological tissues are capable of undergoing large deformations, the linear theories are unsatisfactory in describing the mechanical response of these tissues. However, some linear analyses are done in this work to help understand the more involved nonlinear behavior. The PE view allows a quantitative prediction of the mechanical response and specifically the pore pressure fluid flow which may be related to the transport of the macromolecules and other solutes in the biological tissues. A special mechanical analysis was performed on a representative arterial walls in order to investigate the effects of nonlinearity on the fluid flow across the walls. Based on a finite strain poroelastic theory developed in this work; axisymmetric, plane strain FE models were developed to study the quasi-static behavior of large arteries. The accuracy of the FE models was verified by comparison with analytical solutions wherever is possible. These numerical models were used to evaluate variables and parameters, that are difficult or may be impossible to measure experimentally. For instance, pore pressure distribution within the tissue, relative fluid flow; deformation of the wall; and stress distribution across the wall were obtained using the poroelastic FE models. The effect of hypertension on the mechanical response of the arterial wall was studied using the nonlinear finite element models. This study demonstrated that the finite element models are powerful tools for the study of the mechanics of complicated structures such as biological tissue. It is also shown that the nonlinear multiphasic theory, developed in this thesis, is valid for describing the mechanical response of biological tissue structures under mechanical loadings.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPorous materials -- Mathematical models.en_US
dc.subjectArteries -- Mathematical models.en_US
dc.subjectDeformations (Mechanics)en_US
dc.subjectMultiphase flow.en_US
dc.subjectFinite element method.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAerospace and Mechanical Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSimon, B. R.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDesai, C.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKamel, H.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRichard R.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDaDeppo, D.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9005719en_US
dc.identifier.oclc703274413en_US
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