The deindividuating effects of anonymity on automated group idea generation.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184806
Title:
The deindividuating effects of anonymity on automated group idea generation.
Author:
Jessup, Leonard Michael.
Issue Date:
1989
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Recent developments in information systems technology have made it possible for individuals to work together anonymously using networked personal computers. In this dissertation, a theory of anonymous interaction is proposed. Evidence is provided to suggest that anonymity has deindividuating effects on group process and can, therefore, influence group outcomes in several ways. Two experiments on anonymity in idea generation are presented. In Study 1, where subjects could leave at their discretion, identification kept them longer and caused them to type more, though there were no differences in the quantity or quality of the ideas across experimental conditions. In Study 2, where subjects were forced to stay, identifiability lost importance. Responsibility, however, rose in importance. Subjects with sole responsibility for their task produced more output than did subjects who shared responsibility. Taken together, these results forced us to reject the hypothesis that anonymous subjects would produce more output than would identified subjects. These results show that we cannot speak simply of the effects of anonymity on idea generation in computer-supported groups. With a straightforward interpretation of previous experiments on GDSS anonymity, it was hypothesized that anonymous subjects would produce more than identified subjects. They did not. It is clear that anonymity will lead to deindividuation, enabling participants to engage in uninhibited behavior. However, whether their behavior is productive or unproductive is determined, at least in part, by task, interaction, and technology.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Group decision making.; Information storage and retrieval systems.; Computer networks.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Business Administration; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Connolly, Terry

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe deindividuating effects of anonymity on automated group idea generation.en_US
dc.creatorJessup, Leonard Michael.en_US
dc.contributor.authorJessup, Leonard Michael.en_US
dc.date.issued1989en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractRecent developments in information systems technology have made it possible for individuals to work together anonymously using networked personal computers. In this dissertation, a theory of anonymous interaction is proposed. Evidence is provided to suggest that anonymity has deindividuating effects on group process and can, therefore, influence group outcomes in several ways. Two experiments on anonymity in idea generation are presented. In Study 1, where subjects could leave at their discretion, identification kept them longer and caused them to type more, though there were no differences in the quantity or quality of the ideas across experimental conditions. In Study 2, where subjects were forced to stay, identifiability lost importance. Responsibility, however, rose in importance. Subjects with sole responsibility for their task produced more output than did subjects who shared responsibility. Taken together, these results forced us to reject the hypothesis that anonymous subjects would produce more output than would identified subjects. These results show that we cannot speak simply of the effects of anonymity on idea generation in computer-supported groups. With a straightforward interpretation of previous experiments on GDSS anonymity, it was hypothesized that anonymous subjects would produce more than identified subjects. They did not. It is clear that anonymity will lead to deindividuation, enabling participants to engage in uninhibited behavior. However, whether their behavior is productive or unproductive is determined, at least in part, by task, interaction, and technology.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectGroup decision making.en_US
dc.subjectInformation storage and retrieval systems.en_US
dc.subjectComputer networks.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineBusiness Administrationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorConnolly, Terryen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGeorge, Joeyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberShalley, Christinaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberTansik, Daveen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberVogel, Dougen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9003487en_US
dc.identifier.oclc703282746en_US
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