Cognitive dysfunction associated with chronic or recurrent infection with Epstein-Barr virus.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184801
Title:
Cognitive dysfunction associated with chronic or recurrent infection with Epstein-Barr virus.
Author:
Estes, Anne Lynnette
Issue Date:
1989
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Twenty-two subjects with chronic/recurrent Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) infection were compared with 22 controls to assess cognitive dysfunction. Subjects were compared on 15 measures of cognitive functioning from the Boston Diagnostic Aphasia Examination, Perceptual Speed, Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised, Finger Tapping Test, Stroop Test, Trail-Making Test, Wisconsin Card Sorting Test and Revised Wechsler Memory Scale. They also were compared on measures of depression including the Beck Depression Inventory, Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) depression subscale and SCL-90-Revised depression subscale. Group differences were assessed using discriminant analysis. Only some measures were included in this analysis, i.e. percent retention on Visual Reproduction and Logical Memory subtests of the Revised Wechsler Memory Scale, differential between time scores and between error scores on conditions three and two of the Stroop Test and total number of errors and perseverative errors on the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test. The Beck Depression Inventory was included to statistically remove depression effects from cognitive performances. Remaining measures were administered for exploratory and/or comparative purposes only. Results from discriminant analysis revealed significant group differences on the Beck, but not on any cognitive measure either before or after removal of depression effects. However, direction of group differences on cognitive measures occurred as expected. Also, a post-hoc multivariate analysis of variance revealed significant group differences on MMPI scales 1, 2 and 3 with EBV subjects showing higher elevations. Significant group differences also occurred on MMPI scale 7. Two categories of explanation for results are offered. The first suggests that cognitive deficits were missed due to shortcomings in study design. Remaining hypotheses address the possibility that no cognitive deficits occur with chronic/recurrent EBV infection. Suggestion for why EBV patients complain of cognitive deficits include discussion of hysteroid tendencies and intensification of sensations by a focus on somatic processes. The usefulness of assuming a multifactorial basis for symptoms associated with chronic/recurrent EBV infection, and the importance of abandoning the either/or approach of earlier investigators to hypothesizing about etiology, are discussed.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Epstein-Barr virus diseases -- Psychological aspects.; Cognition -- Physiological aspects.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Psychology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Kaszniak, Alfred

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleCognitive dysfunction associated with chronic or recurrent infection with Epstein-Barr virus.en_US
dc.creatorEstes, Anne Lynnetteen_US
dc.contributor.authorEstes, Anne Lynnetteen_US
dc.date.issued1989en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractTwenty-two subjects with chronic/recurrent Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) infection were compared with 22 controls to assess cognitive dysfunction. Subjects were compared on 15 measures of cognitive functioning from the Boston Diagnostic Aphasia Examination, Perceptual Speed, Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised, Finger Tapping Test, Stroop Test, Trail-Making Test, Wisconsin Card Sorting Test and Revised Wechsler Memory Scale. They also were compared on measures of depression including the Beck Depression Inventory, Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) depression subscale and SCL-90-Revised depression subscale. Group differences were assessed using discriminant analysis. Only some measures were included in this analysis, i.e. percent retention on Visual Reproduction and Logical Memory subtests of the Revised Wechsler Memory Scale, differential between time scores and between error scores on conditions three and two of the Stroop Test and total number of errors and perseverative errors on the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test. The Beck Depression Inventory was included to statistically remove depression effects from cognitive performances. Remaining measures were administered for exploratory and/or comparative purposes only. Results from discriminant analysis revealed significant group differences on the Beck, but not on any cognitive measure either before or after removal of depression effects. However, direction of group differences on cognitive measures occurred as expected. Also, a post-hoc multivariate analysis of variance revealed significant group differences on MMPI scales 1, 2 and 3 with EBV subjects showing higher elevations. Significant group differences also occurred on MMPI scale 7. Two categories of explanation for results are offered. The first suggests that cognitive deficits were missed due to shortcomings in study design. Remaining hypotheses address the possibility that no cognitive deficits occur with chronic/recurrent EBV infection. Suggestion for why EBV patients complain of cognitive deficits include discussion of hysteroid tendencies and intensification of sensations by a focus on somatic processes. The usefulness of assuming a multifactorial basis for symptoms associated with chronic/recurrent EBV infection, and the importance of abandoning the either/or approach of earlier investigators to hypothesizing about etiology, are discussed.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEpstein-Barr virus diseases -- Psychological aspects.en_US
dc.subjectCognition -- Physiological aspects.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorKaszniak, Alfreden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberArkowitz, Harold S.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberOlson, Georgeen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLansing, Roberten_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPool, Ronalden_US
dc.identifier.proquest9003483en_US
dc.identifier.oclc703263160en_US
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