Local atmospheric electricity and its possible application in high-energy cosmic ray air shower detection.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184799
Title:
Local atmospheric electricity and its possible application in high-energy cosmic ray air shower detection.
Author:
Chen, Chuxing.
Issue Date:
1989
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
We have conducted an extensive experimental study on the subject of near ground atmospheric electricity. The main objective was to gain more understanding of this particular aspect of atmospheric phenomena, while testing the possible application to cosmic ray research. The results in atmospheric electricity show that there are certain patterns in ion grouping such as the size and lifetime. The average lifetime of ion group is 0.7 seconds and the average size is about 10 meters at our experimental site. Ultrahigh energy cosmic ray air showers should create sizable slow atmospheric electric pulses according to our theoretical calculations. Preliminary studies on air showers with total particle number N equal or greater than 10⁵ (10¹⁵ eV) have yielded strong evidence that slow atmospheric current pulses are associated with air showers. The theory and the experiment agree with each other fairly well when we average over large numbers of events. With our current experimental arrangement, when the air shower exceeds a certain size, the system response saturates. Therefore it is extremely desirable in future research that the counter array be designed for a much higher threshold level, since this prototype experiment indicates that interesting data would be obtained. Another reason for further experimental research being directed toward ultrahigh energy, e.g., N ≥ 10⁷ (10¹⁷ eV) and higher, is to establish a calibration of the slow atmospheric electric signals generated by cosmic rays as a function of primary cosmic ray energy and core location. This type of slow atmospheric electric signal, if fully understood and calibrated, offers a new and potentially less expensive technique to observe ultrahigh energy cosmic ray events, which hold some fundamental keys to the knowledge of the universe on a large scale.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Atmospheric electricity.; Atmospheric ionization.; Cosmic ray showers.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Physics; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Bowen, Theodore

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleLocal atmospheric electricity and its possible application in high-energy cosmic ray air shower detection.en_US
dc.creatorChen, Chuxing.en_US
dc.contributor.authorChen, Chuxing.en_US
dc.date.issued1989en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractWe have conducted an extensive experimental study on the subject of near ground atmospheric electricity. The main objective was to gain more understanding of this particular aspect of atmospheric phenomena, while testing the possible application to cosmic ray research. The results in atmospheric electricity show that there are certain patterns in ion grouping such as the size and lifetime. The average lifetime of ion group is 0.7 seconds and the average size is about 10 meters at our experimental site. Ultrahigh energy cosmic ray air showers should create sizable slow atmospheric electric pulses according to our theoretical calculations. Preliminary studies on air showers with total particle number N equal or greater than 10⁵ (10¹⁵ eV) have yielded strong evidence that slow atmospheric current pulses are associated with air showers. The theory and the experiment agree with each other fairly well when we average over large numbers of events. With our current experimental arrangement, when the air shower exceeds a certain size, the system response saturates. Therefore it is extremely desirable in future research that the counter array be designed for a much higher threshold level, since this prototype experiment indicates that interesting data would be obtained. Another reason for further experimental research being directed toward ultrahigh energy, e.g., N ≥ 10⁷ (10¹⁷ eV) and higher, is to establish a calibration of the slow atmospheric electric signals generated by cosmic rays as a function of primary cosmic ray energy and core location. This type of slow atmospheric electric signal, if fully understood and calibrated, offers a new and potentially less expensive technique to observe ultrahigh energy cosmic ray events, which hold some fundamental keys to the knowledge of the universe on a large scale.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAtmospheric electricity.en_US
dc.subjectAtmospheric ionization.en_US
dc.subjectCosmic ray showers.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePhysicsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBowen, Theodoreen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberChambers, Robert H.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberEmrick, Roy M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberJenkins, Edgar W.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberShupe, Michael A.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9003481en_US
dc.identifier.oclc703263145en_US
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