Correlates of manifest anxiety in children with learning disabilities.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184788
Title:
Correlates of manifest anxiety in children with learning disabilities.
Author:
Stein, Pamela Ann.
Issue Date:
1989
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Hypotheses were proposed suggesting that learning disabilities predispose individuals toward anxiety and that special education intervention moderates the manifestation of anxiety. A regression analysis was performed with the outcome variable of Total Anxiety from The Revised Children's Manifest Anxiety Scale (RCMAS; Reynolds &amp; Richmond, 1985) with data from 91 elementary students with learning disabilities. Predictor variables included Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Revised (WISC-R; Wechsler, 1974) Full Scale Intelligence Quotient (IQ), absolute WISC-R Verbal-Performance IQ differences, discrepancies between WISC-R Full Scale IQs and Woodcock-Johnson Psycho-Educational Battery (WJPEB; Woodcock &amp; Johnson, 1977) achievement scores, percentage of special education intervention per day and percentage of special education per student's total school experience. A stepwise regression analysis resulted in Full Scale IQ (R² =.075) and percentage of special education per day (R² change =.050), as the only variables entered and retained in the equation to predict RCMAS Total Anxiety. The relationship between special education per day and Total Anxiety was positive (Pearson r =.27), which was opposite the hypothesized direction. When entered last in the complete prediction model, special education per day had a significant (p < .05) part correlation of.23. Full Scale IQ had a significant Pearson correlation with RCMAS Total Anxiety (r = -.27) but the part correlation (r = -.20) did not retain significance when the effects of the other predictor variables were held constant. The Learning Disabilities (LD) subject group had a mean Total Anxiety score of 50.6 (SD = 11.7), which was not significantly different than the RCMAS normative group. Separate stepwise regression analyses with outcome variables of the RCMAS factor scores identified predictor variables of Full Scale IQ, percentage of special education per day, or both as best predictors. Special education per total school experience had a significant part correlation (r = -.23) with the Physiological Anxiety factor when entered last in the complete prediction model. The need for cross-validation and further study is emphasized. Alternative explanations for the results of the present study are presented.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Anxiety in children.; Educational psychology.; Learning disabilities -- United States.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Educational Foundations and Administration; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Nicholson, Glen I.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleCorrelates of manifest anxiety in children with learning disabilities.en_US
dc.creatorStein, Pamela Ann.en_US
dc.contributor.authorStein, Pamela Ann.en_US
dc.date.issued1989en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractHypotheses were proposed suggesting that learning disabilities predispose individuals toward anxiety and that special education intervention moderates the manifestation of anxiety. A regression analysis was performed with the outcome variable of Total Anxiety from The Revised Children's Manifest Anxiety Scale (RCMAS; Reynolds &amp; Richmond, 1985) with data from 91 elementary students with learning disabilities. Predictor variables included Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Revised (WISC-R; Wechsler, 1974) Full Scale Intelligence Quotient (IQ), absolute WISC-R Verbal-Performance IQ differences, discrepancies between WISC-R Full Scale IQs and Woodcock-Johnson Psycho-Educational Battery (WJPEB; Woodcock &amp; Johnson, 1977) achievement scores, percentage of special education intervention per day and percentage of special education per student's total school experience. A stepwise regression analysis resulted in Full Scale IQ (R² =.075) and percentage of special education per day (R² change =.050), as the only variables entered and retained in the equation to predict RCMAS Total Anxiety. The relationship between special education per day and Total Anxiety was positive (Pearson r =.27), which was opposite the hypothesized direction. When entered last in the complete prediction model, special education per day had a significant (p < .05) part correlation of.23. Full Scale IQ had a significant Pearson correlation with RCMAS Total Anxiety (r = -.27) but the part correlation (r = -.20) did not retain significance when the effects of the other predictor variables were held constant. The Learning Disabilities (LD) subject group had a mean Total Anxiety score of 50.6 (SD = 11.7), which was not significantly different than the RCMAS normative group. Separate stepwise regression analyses with outcome variables of the RCMAS factor scores identified predictor variables of Full Scale IQ, percentage of special education per day, or both as best predictors. Special education per total school experience had a significant part correlation (r = -.23) with the Physiological Anxiety factor when entered last in the complete prediction model. The need for cross-validation and further study is emphasized. Alternative explanations for the results of the present study are presented.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAnxiety in children.en_US
dc.subjectEducational psychology.en_US
dc.subjectLearning disabilities -- United States.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Foundations and Administrationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorNicholson, Glen I.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMishra, Shitala P/en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSabers, Darrellen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberVan Reusen, Anthony K.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9000781en_US
dc.identifier.oclc702669995en_US
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