Modeling perception of, and response to, suburban land use change: A case study of Paradise Valley, Arizona.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184761
Title:
Modeling perception of, and response to, suburban land use change: A case study of Paradise Valley, Arizona.
Author:
Peterson, Gary George.
Issue Date:
1989
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Conflicts surrounding newly proposed land-uses can have profound and lasting effects on all stakeholders in the land development process. While considerable attention has been directed toward finding ways to mediate land-use conflict, little is known about why such conflict develops: What are the key factors that produce negative perceptions of land-use change? What are the key dimensions that may effect a response to such changes? What is the nature of that response? This study explores these questions focusing on a case study of a newly-proposed land-use change in the Town of Paradise Valley, Arizona. Two separate questionnaire surveys are employed in the study. The first is used to assess conditions prior to widespread knowledge of the proposed change, and the second to evaluate residents' perceptions and responses once the change is widely known and its full impact has been appreciated. Perceptions and responses to the newly-proposed use are modeled using two stepwise multiple regression models. Residents' land-use expectations, community-level activism, as well as their tie to community and location, are found to be significant predictors in both the perception and response models. A general conceptual framework of necessary and sufficient conditions is advanced that captures a series of threshold effects observed between significant predictor and criterion variables.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Land use -- Planning -- Citizen participation.; Land use, Urban -- Arizona -- Paradise Valley.; City planning -- Arizona -- Paradise Valley.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Geography and Regional Development; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Zube, Ervin H.; Mulligan, Gordon F.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleModeling perception of, and response to, suburban land use change: A case study of Paradise Valley, Arizona.en_US
dc.creatorPeterson, Gary George.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPeterson, Gary George.en_US
dc.date.issued1989en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractConflicts surrounding newly proposed land-uses can have profound and lasting effects on all stakeholders in the land development process. While considerable attention has been directed toward finding ways to mediate land-use conflict, little is known about why such conflict develops: What are the key factors that produce negative perceptions of land-use change? What are the key dimensions that may effect a response to such changes? What is the nature of that response? This study explores these questions focusing on a case study of a newly-proposed land-use change in the Town of Paradise Valley, Arizona. Two separate questionnaire surveys are employed in the study. The first is used to assess conditions prior to widespread knowledge of the proposed change, and the second to evaluate residents' perceptions and responses once the change is widely known and its full impact has been appreciated. Perceptions and responses to the newly-proposed use are modeled using two stepwise multiple regression models. Residents' land-use expectations, community-level activism, as well as their tie to community and location, are found to be significant predictors in both the perception and response models. A general conceptual framework of necessary and sufficient conditions is advanced that captures a series of threshold effects observed between significant predictor and criterion variables.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectLand use -- Planning -- Citizen participation.en_US
dc.subjectLand use, Urban -- Arizona -- Paradise Valley.en_US
dc.subjectCity planning -- Arizona -- Paradise Valley.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGeography and Regional Developmenten_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorZube, Ervin H.en_US
dc.contributor.advisorMulligan, Gordon F.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMann, Lawrence D.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMeredith, Keith E.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9000141en_US
dc.identifier.oclc702669904en_US
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