GDI: (Goal Directed Interface): An intelligent, iconic, object-oriented interface for office systems.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184751
Title:
GDI: (Goal Directed Interface): An intelligent, iconic, object-oriented interface for office systems.
Author:
Griggs, Kenneth Andrew.
Issue Date:
1989
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation presents the GDI (Goal Directed Interface) approach to the user interface for office systems. The primary objectives of the approach are to create an interface that (1) requires little user training and (2) tries to perform higher level task activities (ex. 'schedule a meeting') that have been excluded from computerization in the past. The GDI technique (1) postulates a simple model of the office environment consisting of persons, things, and processes, and a decomposable goal set, (2) represents knowledge in the office environment through rules, frames, and scripts, and object-oriented programming techniques, (3) creates an iconic visual representation consisting of persons, things, and processes that closely mimics the user's 'mental model' of the office world, (4) requires that the user's own 'person icon' be present for all interactions so that actions appear to take place in a user controllable context (the user's icon is, literally, in the interface), (5) provides a 'selection window' through which the user communicates his/her goal by grouping relevant icons, (6) uses a rule-based expert system to examine an icon configuration and, through its expertise, derives a user goal (despite ambiguous or faulty icon placements), (7) attempts to complete the user goal through the use of scripts and multiple expert systems.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Office practice -- Automation.; Interactive computer systems.; Electronic data processing.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Business Administration; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Nunamaker, Jay F.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleGDI: (Goal Directed Interface): An intelligent, iconic, object-oriented interface for office systems.en_US
dc.creatorGriggs, Kenneth Andrew.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGriggs, Kenneth Andrew.en_US
dc.date.issued1989en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation presents the GDI (Goal Directed Interface) approach to the user interface for office systems. The primary objectives of the approach are to create an interface that (1) requires little user training and (2) tries to perform higher level task activities (ex. 'schedule a meeting') that have been excluded from computerization in the past. The GDI technique (1) postulates a simple model of the office environment consisting of persons, things, and processes, and a decomposable goal set, (2) represents knowledge in the office environment through rules, frames, and scripts, and object-oriented programming techniques, (3) creates an iconic visual representation consisting of persons, things, and processes that closely mimics the user's 'mental model' of the office world, (4) requires that the user's own 'person icon' be present for all interactions so that actions appear to take place in a user controllable context (the user's icon is, literally, in the interface), (5) provides a 'selection window' through which the user communicates his/her goal by grouping relevant icons, (6) uses a rule-based expert system to examine an icon configuration and, through its expertise, derives a user goal (despite ambiguous or faulty icon placements), (7) attempts to complete the user goal through the use of scripts and multiple expert systems.en_US
dc.description.noteDigitization note: p. 185 missing from paper original.en
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectOffice practice -- Automation.en_US
dc.subjectInteractive computer systems.en_US
dc.subjectElectronic data processing.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineBusiness Administrationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorNunamaker, Jay F.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSheng, Oliviaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWeber, Sueen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9000130en_US
dc.identifier.oclc703280513en_US
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