Characterization of a charge injection device detector for atomic emission spectroscopy.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184735
Title:
Characterization of a charge injection device detector for atomic emission spectroscopy.
Author:
Sims, Gary Robert.
Issue Date:
1989
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
A Charge Injection Device (CID) detector has been evaluated as a detector for simultaneous multielement atomic emission spectroscopy. The CID was incorporated into a special liquid nitrogen cooled, computer controlled camera system. Electro-optical characterization of the CID and camera system included determination of readout noise, quantum efficiency, spatial crosstalk, temporal hysteresis, spatial response uniformity, and linear dynamic range. The CID was used as a spectroscopic detector for an echelle grating spectrometer equipped with a direct current plasma emission source. The spectrometer was a standard commercial instrument modified to provide a reduced image format more suitable for use with the CID detector. The optical characteristics of this spectrometer, including wavelength coverage, and optical aberrations are described. The spectroscopic system was evaluated with respect to detection limits, linear dynamic range, and accuracy in both single element and simultaneous multielement modes. Detection limits compared well to literature values reported for photomultiplier tube detector based systems under similar conditions. CID detection limits were superior in the near infrared and visible wavelength region, comparable in the middle UV, and higher in the far UV. The detection limits were determined to be limited by background radiation shot noise. Several elements of a certified standard reference material were simultaneously determined in order to assess the accuracy of the spectroscopic system. The results were highly accurate, even when operating near or below the 3σ limits of detection. Spectral interferences for elements were avoided by using several analytical lines for each element. The results of these investigations indicate that the CID is a superior multichannel detector for analytical atomic emission spectrometry. The capability to simultaneously monitor a wide, continuous spectral range with high spatial resolution, high dynamic range, low readout noise, and insignificant signal crosstalk is now possible. Many analytical benefits of this approach, such as the potential capability to perform rapid qualitative and semiquantitative analysis and the ability to select the optimum spectral lines for highly accurate quantitative analysis are now readily achievable.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Atomic emission spectroscopy.; Spectrum analysis -- Instruments.; Scientific apparatus and instruments -- Design and construction.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Chemistry; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Denton, Bonner

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleCharacterization of a charge injection device detector for atomic emission spectroscopy.en_US
dc.creatorSims, Gary Robert.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSims, Gary Robert.en_US
dc.date.issued1989en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractA Charge Injection Device (CID) detector has been evaluated as a detector for simultaneous multielement atomic emission spectroscopy. The CID was incorporated into a special liquid nitrogen cooled, computer controlled camera system. Electro-optical characterization of the CID and camera system included determination of readout noise, quantum efficiency, spatial crosstalk, temporal hysteresis, spatial response uniformity, and linear dynamic range. The CID was used as a spectroscopic detector for an echelle grating spectrometer equipped with a direct current plasma emission source. The spectrometer was a standard commercial instrument modified to provide a reduced image format more suitable for use with the CID detector. The optical characteristics of this spectrometer, including wavelength coverage, and optical aberrations are described. The spectroscopic system was evaluated with respect to detection limits, linear dynamic range, and accuracy in both single element and simultaneous multielement modes. Detection limits compared well to literature values reported for photomultiplier tube detector based systems under similar conditions. CID detection limits were superior in the near infrared and visible wavelength region, comparable in the middle UV, and higher in the far UV. The detection limits were determined to be limited by background radiation shot noise. Several elements of a certified standard reference material were simultaneously determined in order to assess the accuracy of the spectroscopic system. The results were highly accurate, even when operating near or below the 3σ limits of detection. Spectral interferences for elements were avoided by using several analytical lines for each element. The results of these investigations indicate that the CID is a superior multichannel detector for analytical atomic emission spectrometry. The capability to simultaneously monitor a wide, continuous spectral range with high spatial resolution, high dynamic range, low readout noise, and insignificant signal crosstalk is now possible. Many analytical benefits of this approach, such as the potential capability to perform rapid qualitative and semiquantitative analysis and the ability to select the optimum spectral lines for highly accurate quantitative analysis are now readily achievable.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAtomic emission spectroscopy.en_US
dc.subjectSpectrum analysis -- Instruments.en_US
dc.subjectScientific apparatus and instruments -- Design and construction.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineChemistryen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorDenton, Bonneren_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPemberton, Jeanne E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFernando, Quintusen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMiller, Walter B.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest8919058en_US
dc.identifier.oclc702476138en_US
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