Discriminating clinic from control groups of deaf adults using a short form of the Brauer-Gallaudet American Sign Language translation of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184734
Title:
Discriminating clinic from control groups of deaf adults using a short form of the Brauer-Gallaudet American Sign Language translation of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory.
Author:
Riley-Glassman, Nathan David.
Issue Date:
1989
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study tested whether an American Sign Language (ASL) MMPI short form, the Brauer-Gallaudet MMPI-168 (B-G MMPI-168), could discriminate between groups of deaf adults with and without psychopathology. B-G MMPI-168 and MMPI-168 profiles were also compared in deaf adults without a history of psychopathology. Independent variables were history of mental health treatment, language of administration and reading ability. Dependent variables were MMPI-168 and B-G MMPI-168 validity and clinical scale evaluations. Fifty-nine deaf adults from the community and outpatient counseling services completed demographic information on a questionnaire developed especially for this study. Subjects were divided into Clinic and Control groups based on history (Clinic) or no history (Control) of mental health treatment. Reading Comprehension scores (Advanced Stanford Achievement Test) of Control subjects determined placement in Control (I), (11th grade and above) and Control (II), (6-11 grade) groups. All subjects took the B-G MMPI-168. Control subjects took the MMPI-168 at home within two weeks. Ten dollars was earned for participation. Results indicated that Clinic and Control (II) groups were not accurately discriminated by B-G MMPI-168 profiles. The "hit rate" for the Clinic group was 96.5 percent, but only 40.0% of the Control subjects were correctly classified as Not Disturbed. This version of the B-G MMPI-168 was judged unacceptable for clinical use until items are revised. Level of reading ability was not a significant factor in the clinical validity of the MMPI-168. The "hit rates" of correct classification of Control (I) and Control (II) subjects as Not Disturbed, 58.8 and 46.2, respectively, were unacceptable. Language of administration was not a significant factor in the clinical validity of Control group "168" profiles. B-G MMPI-168 profiles showed more psychopathology than MMPI-168 profiles, but both tests had unacceptably high percentages of Control subjects classified as Disturbed. Revision of B-G MMPI-168 items was recommended so that profiles can accurately discriminate between Clinic and Control groups. The MMPI-168 was recommended for use as part of a personality assessment battery for deaf adults having 12th grade equivalent or higher reading level.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Deaf -- Psychological testing.; Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Special Education and Rehabilitation; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Eldredge, Nancy

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleDiscriminating clinic from control groups of deaf adults using a short form of the Brauer-Gallaudet American Sign Language translation of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory.en_US
dc.creatorRiley-Glassman, Nathan David.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRiley-Glassman, Nathan David.en_US
dc.date.issued1989en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study tested whether an American Sign Language (ASL) MMPI short form, the Brauer-Gallaudet MMPI-168 (B-G MMPI-168), could discriminate between groups of deaf adults with and without psychopathology. B-G MMPI-168 and MMPI-168 profiles were also compared in deaf adults without a history of psychopathology. Independent variables were history of mental health treatment, language of administration and reading ability. Dependent variables were MMPI-168 and B-G MMPI-168 validity and clinical scale evaluations. Fifty-nine deaf adults from the community and outpatient counseling services completed demographic information on a questionnaire developed especially for this study. Subjects were divided into Clinic and Control groups based on history (Clinic) or no history (Control) of mental health treatment. Reading Comprehension scores (Advanced Stanford Achievement Test) of Control subjects determined placement in Control (I), (11th grade and above) and Control (II), (6-11 grade) groups. All subjects took the B-G MMPI-168. Control subjects took the MMPI-168 at home within two weeks. Ten dollars was earned for participation. Results indicated that Clinic and Control (II) groups were not accurately discriminated by B-G MMPI-168 profiles. The "hit rate" for the Clinic group was 96.5 percent, but only 40.0% of the Control subjects were correctly classified as Not Disturbed. This version of the B-G MMPI-168 was judged unacceptable for clinical use until items are revised. Level of reading ability was not a significant factor in the clinical validity of the MMPI-168. The "hit rates" of correct classification of Control (I) and Control (II) subjects as Not Disturbed, 58.8 and 46.2, respectively, were unacceptable. Language of administration was not a significant factor in the clinical validity of Control group "168" profiles. B-G MMPI-168 profiles showed more psychopathology than MMPI-168 profiles, but both tests had unacceptably high percentages of Control subjects classified as Disturbed. Revision of B-G MMPI-168 items was recommended so that profiles can accurately discriminate between Clinic and Control groups. The MMPI-168 was recommended for use as part of a personality assessment battery for deaf adults having 12th grade equivalent or higher reading level.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectDeaf -- Psychological testing.en_US
dc.subjectMinnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSpecial Education and Rehabilitationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorEldredge, Nancyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberOrganist, Jamesen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberJohnson, Boben_US
dc.identifier.proquest8919056en_US
dc.identifier.oclc702464057en_US
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