A knowledge-based electronic messaging system: Framework, design, prototype development, and validation.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184727
Title:
A knowledge-based electronic messaging system: Framework, design, prototype development, and validation.
Author:
Motiwalla, Luvai Fazlehusen.
Issue Date:
1989
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Although electronic messaging systems (EMS) are an attractive business communication medium several studies on the usage and impact of EMS have shown that despite the benefits, they have been generally used for routine and informal communication activities. Theoretically, EMS have yet to find their niche in organizational communications. Technically, EMS designs are not flexible to support communication activities of managers, are not maintainable to permit easy integration with other office applications and access to information from data/knowledge bases, and are not easily extendible beyond the scope of their initial design. Behaviorally, end users are not directly involved in the development of EMS. This dissertation attempts to bridge the transition of EMS technology from message processing systems to communication support systems. First, the dissertation provides an analysis for a knowledge-based messaging system (KMS) through a framework. The framework provides a theoretical basis to link management theory to EMS technology. It suggests that the communication needs of the managers vary depending on the activity level, implying related variations in EMS functionality. Second, the dissertation provides a design for the KMS through an architecture which incorporates the design and implementation issues such as, flexibility, maintainability, and extendibility. The superimposition of the KMS on an existing EMS provides flexibility, the loose coupling between the KMS-interface components and the KMS-functions increases its maintainability, and the strong functional decomposition and cohesion enhances the extendibility of the system beyond the scope of its initial design. Finally, the dissertation provides a implementation through the development of a prototype KMS which involves users into the design process through a validation study conducted at University of Arizona. The prototype used GDSS tools in eliciting message attributes for the personal knowledge base. This method proved effective in reducing the bottleneck observed in the acquisition of knowledge from multiple experts, simultaneously. Similarly, the combination of observation with interviews proved effective in eliciting the organizational knowledge base. The validation method measured the system's accuracy (which was very accurate) in prioritizing messages for the users.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Electronic mail systems.; Electronic data processing.; Computer networks.; Office practice -- Automation.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Business Administration; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Nunamaker, Jay F.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleA knowledge-based electronic messaging system: Framework, design, prototype development, and validation.en_US
dc.creatorMotiwalla, Luvai Fazlehusen.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMotiwalla, Luvai Fazlehusen.en_US
dc.date.issued1989en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractAlthough electronic messaging systems (EMS) are an attractive business communication medium several studies on the usage and impact of EMS have shown that despite the benefits, they have been generally used for routine and informal communication activities. Theoretically, EMS have yet to find their niche in organizational communications. Technically, EMS designs are not flexible to support communication activities of managers, are not maintainable to permit easy integration with other office applications and access to information from data/knowledge bases, and are not easily extendible beyond the scope of their initial design. Behaviorally, end users are not directly involved in the development of EMS. This dissertation attempts to bridge the transition of EMS technology from message processing systems to communication support systems. First, the dissertation provides an analysis for a knowledge-based messaging system (KMS) through a framework. The framework provides a theoretical basis to link management theory to EMS technology. It suggests that the communication needs of the managers vary depending on the activity level, implying related variations in EMS functionality. Second, the dissertation provides a design for the KMS through an architecture which incorporates the design and implementation issues such as, flexibility, maintainability, and extendibility. The superimposition of the KMS on an existing EMS provides flexibility, the loose coupling between the KMS-interface components and the KMS-functions increases its maintainability, and the strong functional decomposition and cohesion enhances the extendibility of the system beyond the scope of its initial design. Finally, the dissertation provides a implementation through the development of a prototype KMS which involves users into the design process through a validation study conducted at University of Arizona. The prototype used GDSS tools in eliciting message attributes for the personal knowledge base. This method proved effective in reducing the bottleneck observed in the acquisition of knowledge from multiple experts, simultaneously. Similarly, the combination of observation with interviews proved effective in eliciting the organizational knowledge base. The validation method measured the system's accuracy (which was very accurate) in prioritizing messages for the users.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectElectronic mail systems.en_US
dc.subjectElectronic data processing.en_US
dc.subjectComputer networks.en_US
dc.subjectOffice practice -- Automation.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineBusiness Administrationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorNunamaker, Jay F.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSheng, Olivia R. Liuen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberVogel, Douglas R.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest8919049en_US
dc.identifier.oclc702134711en_US
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