Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184722
Title:
Secondary school climate: Using an ecological perspective.
Author:
McLeod, Charles Ruffin.
Issue Date:
1989
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this study is to provide data which will enable administrators, through climate assessment, to make concrete decisions regarding perceptions that can be utilized in targeting areas within the school which need intervention or improvement. The main emphasis of the study is to assess various stakeholders' perceptions regarding school variables (teacher/student relationships, security and maintenance, administration, student academic orientation, student behavioral values, guidance, student/peer relationships, parent and community/school relationships, instructional management, and student activities) and to note perceptual trends, similarities, and differences among stakeholder groups. Much of the existing literature views climate as a separate, yet related, component of effective schools. This study's focus is on better understanding climate from the ecological perspective, viewing climate as a tool in which school climate research can be used in school improvement programs to ensure consistency in conceptualizing and measuring school climate. This study goes beyond many in that it attempts to understand climate from various stakeholders' perceptions, and to discern any patterns or relationships among these. Unlike the previous studies of school climate which consider the perceptions of only one or two groups, this concept of school climate is driven by the shared perceptions of key stakeholder groups in the school operation of itself--Board members, Administration, classified staff, the students, teachers, and parents/community members. Because an inductive research method is most appropriate for a study of this type, a quasi-case study approach was selected as the research procedure. The following data analysis process was used in the study, for each of the ten subcategories of respondent, gender, ethnicity, and group/role, an analysis of variance and test of significance were conducted. These results are presented according to the research questions and subcategory. The contribution that this study makes is in the analysis of climate data. The data presented, looking at group means in the climate subcategories to give a broad, general impression of the school's climate. As the data were broken apart and regrouped, important patterns emerged. This information provides much more specific guidance in targeting school improvement, as well as delineating precisely the subcategories of particular concern to various stakeholder groups. This approach to unpacking the school climate concept takes advantage of the multiple characteristics of this school climate study, and acknowledges the different interests of groups within a school. Given scarce resources and competition for people's time, a finer grained analysis of a school's problems is a rational beginning to focused interventions.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
School management and organization -- Arizona.; High schools -- Arizona -- Evaluation.; Educational evaluation -- Arizona.
Degree Name:
Ed.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Educational Foundations and Administration; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Antley, Elizabeth

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleSecondary school climate: Using an ecological perspective.en_US
dc.creatorMcLeod, Charles Ruffin.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMcLeod, Charles Ruffin.en_US
dc.date.issued1989en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study is to provide data which will enable administrators, through climate assessment, to make concrete decisions regarding perceptions that can be utilized in targeting areas within the school which need intervention or improvement. The main emphasis of the study is to assess various stakeholders' perceptions regarding school variables (teacher/student relationships, security and maintenance, administration, student academic orientation, student behavioral values, guidance, student/peer relationships, parent and community/school relationships, instructional management, and student activities) and to note perceptual trends, similarities, and differences among stakeholder groups. Much of the existing literature views climate as a separate, yet related, component of effective schools. This study's focus is on better understanding climate from the ecological perspective, viewing climate as a tool in which school climate research can be used in school improvement programs to ensure consistency in conceptualizing and measuring school climate. This study goes beyond many in that it attempts to understand climate from various stakeholders' perceptions, and to discern any patterns or relationships among these. Unlike the previous studies of school climate which consider the perceptions of only one or two groups, this concept of school climate is driven by the shared perceptions of key stakeholder groups in the school operation of itself--Board members, Administration, classified staff, the students, teachers, and parents/community members. Because an inductive research method is most appropriate for a study of this type, a quasi-case study approach was selected as the research procedure. The following data analysis process was used in the study, for each of the ten subcategories of respondent, gender, ethnicity, and group/role, an analysis of variance and test of significance were conducted. These results are presented according to the research questions and subcategory. The contribution that this study makes is in the analysis of climate data. The data presented, looking at group means in the climate subcategories to give a broad, general impression of the school's climate. As the data were broken apart and regrouped, important patterns emerged. This information provides much more specific guidance in targeting school improvement, as well as delineating precisely the subcategories of particular concern to various stakeholder groups. This approach to unpacking the school climate concept takes advantage of the multiple characteristics of this school climate study, and acknowledges the different interests of groups within a school. Given scarce resources and competition for people's time, a finer grained analysis of a school's problems is a rational beginning to focused interventions.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectSchool management and organization -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectHigh schools -- Arizona -- Evaluation.en_US
dc.subjectEducational evaluation -- Arizona.en_US
thesis.degree.nameEd.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Foundations and Administrationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorAntley, Elizabethen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGrant, Roberten_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSacken, Michaelen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8919045en_US
dc.identifier.oclc702134609en_US
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