The use of charge transfer device detectors and spatial interferometry for analytical spectroscopy.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184683
Title:
The use of charge transfer device detectors and spatial interferometry for analytical spectroscopy.
Author:
Sweedler, Jonathan VanSyckle.
Issue Date:
1989
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The research described in this dissertation conclusively demonstrates the superior qualitative and quantitative performance of spectroscopic systems which employ a new class of optical detectors--charge transfer device (CTD) detectors. An overview of the operation and characteristics of these detectors, as well as theoretical models predicting their performance are presented. The evaluation of a unique prototype single element CID detector, a commercially available linear CCD detector, and a prototype two-dimensional CCD detector are described. Outstanding characteristics include the ability of the single element CID to quantitate photon fluxes ranging over eleven orders of magnitude, a quantum efficiency of the linear CCD in excess of 90%, and a read noise of the two-dimensional CCD of under 5 electrons. In addition, the use of the linear CCD for molecular fluorescence spectroscopy is demonstrated. A direct comparison of CCD and CID detection for atomic emission spectroscopy using a custom echelle system is described. The second part of these investigations focus on the design of spectrometers compatible with the format of these multichannel detectors. While a large number of spectrometer designs exist, the spectrometer and detector combination which produces the highest possible signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) spectra for a given experimental system is almost always desired. The investigations into optimum spectrometer design have led to the use of a unique spatial interferometer system. The performance of a common path interferometer using a linear charge-coupled device detectors is presented and compared to conventional dispersive systems. The throughput, resolution, and other practical factors are discussed. The common path system has a much larger light gathering ability compared to dispersive systems; however, spatial interferometry suffers from the multiplex disadvantages encountered with other forms of UV/Vis interferometry. A unique crossed interferometric dispersive arrangement allows the simultaneous acquisition of the spectral information while greatly reducing these multiplex disadvantages. Preliminary work on the crossed interferometric system is presented demonstrating significant reduction of these multiplex disadvantages.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Charge transfer devices (Electronics); Spectrum analysis -- Instruments.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Chemistry; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Fernando, Quintus

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe use of charge transfer device detectors and spatial interferometry for analytical spectroscopy.en_US
dc.creatorSweedler, Jonathan VanSyckle.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSweedler, Jonathan VanSyckle.en_US
dc.date.issued1989en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe research described in this dissertation conclusively demonstrates the superior qualitative and quantitative performance of spectroscopic systems which employ a new class of optical detectors--charge transfer device (CTD) detectors. An overview of the operation and characteristics of these detectors, as well as theoretical models predicting their performance are presented. The evaluation of a unique prototype single element CID detector, a commercially available linear CCD detector, and a prototype two-dimensional CCD detector are described. Outstanding characteristics include the ability of the single element CID to quantitate photon fluxes ranging over eleven orders of magnitude, a quantum efficiency of the linear CCD in excess of 90%, and a read noise of the two-dimensional CCD of under 5 electrons. In addition, the use of the linear CCD for molecular fluorescence spectroscopy is demonstrated. A direct comparison of CCD and CID detection for atomic emission spectroscopy using a custom echelle system is described. The second part of these investigations focus on the design of spectrometers compatible with the format of these multichannel detectors. While a large number of spectrometer designs exist, the spectrometer and detector combination which produces the highest possible signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) spectra for a given experimental system is almost always desired. The investigations into optimum spectrometer design have led to the use of a unique spatial interferometer system. The performance of a common path interferometer using a linear charge-coupled device detectors is presented and compared to conventional dispersive systems. The throughput, resolution, and other practical factors are discussed. The common path system has a much larger light gathering ability compared to dispersive systems; however, spatial interferometry suffers from the multiplex disadvantages encountered with other forms of UV/Vis interferometry. A unique crossed interferometric dispersive arrangement allows the simultaneous acquisition of the spectral information while greatly reducing these multiplex disadvantages. Preliminary work on the crossed interferometric system is presented demonstrating significant reduction of these multiplex disadvantages.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectCharge transfer devices (Electronics)en_US
dc.subjectSpectrum analysis -- Instruments.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineChemistryen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorFernando, Quintusen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBurke, Mikeen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberVemulapalli, Krishnaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBickel, Billen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8915989en_US
dc.identifier.oclc702371776en_US
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