Spectral and spatial variability of the soils on the Maricopa Agricultural Center, Arizona.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184678
Title:
Spectral and spatial variability of the soils on the Maricopa Agricultural Center, Arizona.
Author:
Suliman, Ahmed Saeid Ahmed.
Issue Date:
1989
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Dry and wet fine earth spectral measurements were made on the Ap soil surface horizons on the Maricopa Agricultural Center by using a Barnes Modular Multiband Radiometer. Three subsets were used in the analyses 552, 101 and 11. There were three soil series, Casa Grande, Shontik and Trix, four soil mapping units, and three texture classes identified on the farm. The wet soil condition reduced the amplitude of the spectral curves over the entire spectrum range (0.45 to 2.35 μm). The spectral curves were statistically related to the soil mapping units to determine if the soil mapping units and texture classes could be separated. The wet soil condition and the smaller sample size increased the correct classification percentages for soil mapping units and texture classes. LSD tests showed there were significant differences between these groups. Simple- and Multiple-linear regression analysis were used to relate some soil physical (sand, silt and clay contents and color components) and chemical (iron oxide, organic carbon and calcium carbonate contents) to soil spectral responses in the seven bands under dry and wet conditions. There were high correlations levels among the spectral bands showing an overlap of spectral information. Generally, the red (MMR3) and near-infrared (MMR4) bands had the highest correlations with the studied soil properties under dry and wet conditions. Usually, the wet soil condition resulted in higher correlations than that for the dry soil condition over the total spectrum range. The predictive equations for sand, silt and clay and iron oxide contents were satisfactory. For organic carbon and color components, the greatest success was achieved when variation in spectral response within individual samples are smaller than that between soil mapping unit group averages. There was a poor relation between calcium carbonate and spectral response. A comparison of multi-level remotely sensed data collected by SPOT, aircraft, and ground instruments showed a strong agreement among the data sets, which correlated well to fine earth data, except for the SPOT data. Rough soil surfaces showed a reduction in reflectance altitude compared to laser level, and it appears to be directly proportional to the percent shadow in the viewing area measured by SPOT satellite and aircraft.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Agriculture -- Arizona -- Maricopa County -- Remote sensing.; Remote sensing -- Arizona -- Maricopa County.; Soils -- Arizona -- Maricopa County -- Remote sensing.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Soil and Water Science; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Post, Donald F.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleSpectral and spatial variability of the soils on the Maricopa Agricultural Center, Arizona.en_US
dc.creatorSuliman, Ahmed Saeid Ahmed.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSuliman, Ahmed Saeid Ahmed.en_US
dc.date.issued1989en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractDry and wet fine earth spectral measurements were made on the Ap soil surface horizons on the Maricopa Agricultural Center by using a Barnes Modular Multiband Radiometer. Three subsets were used in the analyses 552, 101 and 11. There were three soil series, Casa Grande, Shontik and Trix, four soil mapping units, and three texture classes identified on the farm. The wet soil condition reduced the amplitude of the spectral curves over the entire spectrum range (0.45 to 2.35 μm). The spectral curves were statistically related to the soil mapping units to determine if the soil mapping units and texture classes could be separated. The wet soil condition and the smaller sample size increased the correct classification percentages for soil mapping units and texture classes. LSD tests showed there were significant differences between these groups. Simple- and Multiple-linear regression analysis were used to relate some soil physical (sand, silt and clay contents and color components) and chemical (iron oxide, organic carbon and calcium carbonate contents) to soil spectral responses in the seven bands under dry and wet conditions. There were high correlations levels among the spectral bands showing an overlap of spectral information. Generally, the red (MMR3) and near-infrared (MMR4) bands had the highest correlations with the studied soil properties under dry and wet conditions. Usually, the wet soil condition resulted in higher correlations than that for the dry soil condition over the total spectrum range. The predictive equations for sand, silt and clay and iron oxide contents were satisfactory. For organic carbon and color components, the greatest success was achieved when variation in spectral response within individual samples are smaller than that between soil mapping unit group averages. There was a poor relation between calcium carbonate and spectral response. A comparison of multi-level remotely sensed data collected by SPOT, aircraft, and ground instruments showed a strong agreement among the data sets, which correlated well to fine earth data, except for the SPOT data. Rough soil surfaces showed a reduction in reflectance altitude compared to laser level, and it appears to be directly proportional to the percent shadow in the viewing area measured by SPOT satellite and aircraft.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture -- Arizona -- Maricopa County -- Remote sensing.en_US
dc.subjectRemote sensing -- Arizona -- Maricopa County.en_US
dc.subjectSoils -- Arizona -- Maricopa County -- Remote sensing.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSoil and Water Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorPost, Donald F.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberJackson, Ray D.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHuete, Alfredoen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHendricks, David M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberTucker, Thomas C.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest8915986en_US
dc.identifier.oclc702663567en_US
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