Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184660
Title:
Computers in composition at the University of Arizona.
Author:
McGinnis, Jo Kathryn Dittmar.
Issue Date:
1989
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The University of Arizona Composition Program has demonstrated that computers can be integrated successfully into composition instruction. Administrators and instructors are preparing to offer students in second-semester Freshman Composition (English 102) a computer-integrated course of instruction as the equipment and facilities become available. Chapter I relates how current research shows that computers offer support to current theories in composition and that they can be utilized in all the various processes involved with producing university writing. It explores the problems program directors and university administrators face in providing computer technology to undergraduates in writing courses. Chapter II compares the reactions of Southern Arizona Writing Project teacher-participants with freshman students in a pilot section of English 102 at the University of Arizona and with comparable undergraduates at other universities as they learn to use word processors as a tool for writing. Some differences between the older SAWP participants and the undergraduates were observed, especially a greater computer anxiety and a greater of urgency to learn about computers. The SAWP participants had less time to become proficient computer writers than did the freshmen. All these factors probably contributed to their lower success rate as computer writers. Nevertheless, a large majority of all ages of computer writers recognize the benefits of using word processors for writing and even those SAWP participants who made only limited progress expressed a sense of satisfaction at having mastered the machine. Chapter III describes ways that computer writing and strategies of collaborative learning and peer review were adapted to the syllabus of English 102 in a pilot class at the University of Arizona. Students reacted favorably to both computers and to the teaching strategies. However, the vision of total computer integration resulting in a paper-free writing course cannot be achieved without either restructuring the syllabus or acquiring substantially improved computer facilities, especially through networked workstations and computerized classrooms.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
English language -- Composition and exercises -- Study and teaching -- Data processing.; Word processing in education.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
English; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleComputers in composition at the University of Arizona.en_US
dc.creatorMcGinnis, Jo Kathryn Dittmar.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMcGinnis, Jo Kathryn Dittmar.en_US
dc.date.issued1989en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe University of Arizona Composition Program has demonstrated that computers can be integrated successfully into composition instruction. Administrators and instructors are preparing to offer students in second-semester Freshman Composition (English 102) a computer-integrated course of instruction as the equipment and facilities become available. Chapter I relates how current research shows that computers offer support to current theories in composition and that they can be utilized in all the various processes involved with producing university writing. It explores the problems program directors and university administrators face in providing computer technology to undergraduates in writing courses. Chapter II compares the reactions of Southern Arizona Writing Project teacher-participants with freshman students in a pilot section of English 102 at the University of Arizona and with comparable undergraduates at other universities as they learn to use word processors as a tool for writing. Some differences between the older SAWP participants and the undergraduates were observed, especially a greater computer anxiety and a greater of urgency to learn about computers. The SAWP participants had less time to become proficient computer writers than did the freshmen. All these factors probably contributed to their lower success rate as computer writers. Nevertheless, a large majority of all ages of computer writers recognize the benefits of using word processors for writing and even those SAWP participants who made only limited progress expressed a sense of satisfaction at having mastered the machine. Chapter III describes ways that computer writing and strategies of collaborative learning and peer review were adapted to the syllabus of English 102 in a pilot class at the University of Arizona. Students reacted favorably to both computers and to the teaching strategies. However, the vision of total computer integration resulting in a paper-free writing course cannot be achieved without either restructuring the syllabus or acquiring substantially improved computer facilities, especially through networked workstations and computerized classrooms.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEnglish language -- Composition and exercises -- Study and teaching -- Data processing.en_US
dc.subjectWord processing in education.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEnglishen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8915969en_US
dc.identifier.oclc702127125en_US
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