Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184657
Title:
Maternal personality characteristics and familial sexual abuse.
Author:
Lesnik, Susan Martin.
Issue Date:
1989
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Previous clinical observations have suggested that mothers of incest victims are dependent, may be physically or mentally ill, are unable to assume adult responsibilities and have marital difficulties. In addition, they have been described as victims themselves with a history of abuse in their own childhood. There is little empirical data to support these observations. Thirty-one mothers of incest victims and a control group of thirty mothers whose children were not incest victims completed psychological tests and a demographic questionnaire in order to empirically test the constructs of dependency, mental and physical illness, role reversal, marital dysfunction and childhood history of abuse. Age, education and ethnicity did not differ in the two groups. 42% of the mothers of incest victims reported experiencing sexual abuse as a child; 13% of the control group reported sexual abuse. Childhood physical abuse and neglect were also significantly higher for the experimental group. Mothers in the experimental group were found to have married more times and to have more children than mothers in the control group. Results of analyses of variance showed significant differences between groups on measures of family conflict and lack of family cohesion. No significant differences were found between groups on measures of dependency, marital adjustment, depression, physical illness, and role reversal. Results of a discriminant function analysis suggest that a combination of variables such as sexual abuse as a child, number of marriages, depression and dependency, while not significant as lone indicators, may provide the clinician with additional information in assessing possible incest within a family. Additional empirical longitudinal research is needed to further clarify maternal personality characteristics in the incestuous family.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Psychology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleMaternal personality characteristics and familial sexual abuse.en_US
dc.creatorLesnik, Susan Martin.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLesnik, Susan Martin.en_US
dc.date.issued1989en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractPrevious clinical observations have suggested that mothers of incest victims are dependent, may be physically or mentally ill, are unable to assume adult responsibilities and have marital difficulties. In addition, they have been described as victims themselves with a history of abuse in their own childhood. There is little empirical data to support these observations. Thirty-one mothers of incest victims and a control group of thirty mothers whose children were not incest victims completed psychological tests and a demographic questionnaire in order to empirically test the constructs of dependency, mental and physical illness, role reversal, marital dysfunction and childhood history of abuse. Age, education and ethnicity did not differ in the two groups. 42% of the mothers of incest victims reported experiencing sexual abuse as a child; 13% of the control group reported sexual abuse. Childhood physical abuse and neglect were also significantly higher for the experimental group. Mothers in the experimental group were found to have married more times and to have more children than mothers in the control group. Results of analyses of variance showed significant differences between groups on measures of family conflict and lack of family cohesion. No significant differences were found between groups on measures of dependency, marital adjustment, depression, physical illness, and role reversal. Results of a discriminant function analysis suggest that a combination of variables such as sexual abuse as a child, number of marriages, depression and dependency, while not significant as lone indicators, may provide the clinician with additional information in assessing possible incest within a family. Additional empirical longitudinal research is needed to further clarify maternal personality characteristics in the incestuous family.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8915967en_US
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