Obesity in a Southwest Native American tribe: Examination of prevalence, predictive factors, and health risks.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184648
Title:
Obesity in a Southwest Native American tribe: Examination of prevalence, predictive factors, and health risks.
Author:
Gray, Norma.
Issue Date:
1989
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This research examined obesity in a Southwest Native American Tribe by utilizing data obtained from Indian Health Service regarding individuals who used their health clinics. Sixteen cohorts, ranging in age from 3 to 75 years, were studied across the four years of 1971, 1976, 1981, and 1986. This was an exploratory study designed to investigate four areas related to obesity in this Tribe: (1) Weight and height norms, (2) prevalence of obesity, (3) factors predictive of adolescent obesity, and (4) health risks associated with obesity. The results indicate that this population of Southwest Native Americans generally weigh more and are shorter than national norms, which results in significantly greater BMIs. Norms for weight, height, and Body Mass Index (BMI) were established for all categories during each of the data gathering years of 1971, 1976, 1981, and 1986. Prevalence of obesity based on weight and BMI was established for this time period, also. Predictive factors of adolescent obesity in this Tribe revealed several of children's prior weight variables to be significantly related to adolescent obesity. Whereas, variables related to the children's mothers tended to be nonsignificant. The results indicated two health problems are related to adult obesity in this population: diabetes and cardiovascular disorders. In addition, blood pressure was also related to obesity in that those who were obese tended to have higher systolic and diastolic blood pressures than the nonobese. Several childhood characteristics are seen as indicators that children may need preventive measures in order to reduce the chance of later obesity. Future research is discussed in terms of prospective studies which might provide more information about obesity in this Tribe.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Indians of North America -- Nutrition.; Indians of North America -- Diseases.; Obesity.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Psychology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleObesity in a Southwest Native American tribe: Examination of prevalence, predictive factors, and health risks.en_US
dc.creatorGray, Norma.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGray, Norma.en_US
dc.date.issued1989en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis research examined obesity in a Southwest Native American Tribe by utilizing data obtained from Indian Health Service regarding individuals who used their health clinics. Sixteen cohorts, ranging in age from 3 to 75 years, were studied across the four years of 1971, 1976, 1981, and 1986. This was an exploratory study designed to investigate four areas related to obesity in this Tribe: (1) Weight and height norms, (2) prevalence of obesity, (3) factors predictive of adolescent obesity, and (4) health risks associated with obesity. The results indicate that this population of Southwest Native Americans generally weigh more and are shorter than national norms, which results in significantly greater BMIs. Norms for weight, height, and Body Mass Index (BMI) were established for all categories during each of the data gathering years of 1971, 1976, 1981, and 1986. Prevalence of obesity based on weight and BMI was established for this time period, also. Predictive factors of adolescent obesity in this Tribe revealed several of children's prior weight variables to be significantly related to adolescent obesity. Whereas, variables related to the children's mothers tended to be nonsignificant. The results indicated two health problems are related to adult obesity in this population: diabetes and cardiovascular disorders. In addition, blood pressure was also related to obesity in that those who were obese tended to have higher systolic and diastolic blood pressures than the nonobese. Several childhood characteristics are seen as indicators that children may need preventive measures in order to reduce the chance of later obesity. Future research is discussed in terms of prospective studies which might provide more information about obesity in this Tribe.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectIndians of North America -- Nutrition.en_US
dc.subjectIndians of North America -- Diseases.en_US
dc.subjectObesity.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8915958en_US
dc.identifier.oclc702150946en_US
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