Molecular events associated with halophytic growth in Lycopersicon pennellii.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184642
Title:
Molecular events associated with halophytic growth in Lycopersicon pennellii.
Author:
Danon, Avihai.
Issue Date:
1989
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
We have studied the effects of exogenous salt on whole plant and suspension culture cells of the halophytic tomato Lycopersicon pennellii. Under low salt conditions (2.9 dS/M) plants showed enhanced (halophytic) growth (107% of control). At moderate (7.5 dS/M) and high (18.5 dS/M) salt levels, salt stress reduced growth to about 78% and 40% of control respectively. Salt-induced changes in root mRNAs were analyzed via two-dimensional PAGE of cell free translation (CFT) products. We have identified 14 proteins whose levels were enhanced by exogenous salt. One of these proteins was unique to low salt induced halophytic growth. This system allowed for discrimination between proteins up-regulated at all salt levels and those up-regulated only during salt stress induced growth reduction. Ten proteins were identified whose levels were reduced by exogenous salt. Once again, one could identify a subset of proteins whose levels were reduced only under salt stressed conditions. Proteins identified in this study are candidates for roles in growth maintaining stress adaptive metabolism in L.pennellii. These data underscore the complexity of the genetic control of salt metabolism in higher plants. The effects of exogenous salt on protein synthesis and accumulation were studied in suspension cultures of L.pennellii. Two salt levels were applied to the cells. Under low salt conditions (LS, 10 mM), L.pennellii cells showed enhanced (halophytic) growth. Under high salt conditions (HS, 50 mM), the cells showed reduced (salt-stressed) growth. Changes in proteins with time were analyzed by a combination of cell free translation, in vivo labeling and total accumulated protein. In vivo labeling studies showed that the pattern of steady state protein synthesis was disrupted shortly after addition of salt. High salt induced greater disruption in the pattern. Over time, the steady state levels of most proteins shifted back towards those of the unstressed-control. However, the level of several proteins remained altered. Analysis of proteins whose levels increased with exogenous salt showed differences in the response patterns that may allow for discrimination between proteins involved in growth maintaining and stress shock responses.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Tomatoes.; Tomatoes -- Growth.; Plants -- Effect of salt on.; Plant proteins.; Plant cell culture.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Plant Sciences; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleMolecular events associated with halophytic growth in Lycopersicon pennellii.en_US
dc.creatorDanon, Avihai.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDanon, Avihai.en_US
dc.date.issued1989en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractWe have studied the effects of exogenous salt on whole plant and suspension culture cells of the halophytic tomato Lycopersicon pennellii. Under low salt conditions (2.9 dS/M) plants showed enhanced (halophytic) growth (107% of control). At moderate (7.5 dS/M) and high (18.5 dS/M) salt levels, salt stress reduced growth to about 78% and 40% of control respectively. Salt-induced changes in root mRNAs were analyzed via two-dimensional PAGE of cell free translation (CFT) products. We have identified 14 proteins whose levels were enhanced by exogenous salt. One of these proteins was unique to low salt induced halophytic growth. This system allowed for discrimination between proteins up-regulated at all salt levels and those up-regulated only during salt stress induced growth reduction. Ten proteins were identified whose levels were reduced by exogenous salt. Once again, one could identify a subset of proteins whose levels were reduced only under salt stressed conditions. Proteins identified in this study are candidates for roles in growth maintaining stress adaptive metabolism in L.pennellii. These data underscore the complexity of the genetic control of salt metabolism in higher plants. The effects of exogenous salt on protein synthesis and accumulation were studied in suspension cultures of L.pennellii. Two salt levels were applied to the cells. Under low salt conditions (LS, 10 mM), L.pennellii cells showed enhanced (halophytic) growth. Under high salt conditions (HS, 50 mM), the cells showed reduced (salt-stressed) growth. Changes in proteins with time were analyzed by a combination of cell free translation, in vivo labeling and total accumulated protein. In vivo labeling studies showed that the pattern of steady state protein synthesis was disrupted shortly after addition of salt. High salt induced greater disruption in the pattern. Over time, the steady state levels of most proteins shifted back towards those of the unstressed-control. However, the level of several proteins remained altered. Analysis of proteins whose levels increased with exogenous salt showed differences in the response patterns that may allow for discrimination between proteins involved in growth maintaining and stress shock responses.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectTomatoes.en_US
dc.subjectTomatoes -- Growth.en_US
dc.subjectPlants -- Effect of salt on.en_US
dc.subjectPlant proteins.en_US
dc.subjectPlant cell culture.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePlant Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMatsuda, K.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMcDaniel, R. G.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberO'Leary, J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSmith, S. S.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest8915953en_US
dc.identifier.oclc702145474en_US
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