Effects of parent training on children's Attention Deficit Disorder: A comparative outcome study.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184640
Title:
Effects of parent training on children's Attention Deficit Disorder: A comparative outcome study.
Author:
Collier, Scott Jeffery
Issue Date:
1989
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Previous research has clearly established the efficacy of behavioral parent training approaches for the treatment of Attention-deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). The purpose of this study was to examine the efficacy of a parent training program utilizing cognitive-behavioral strategies of self-instruction with ADHD children. Parents of 35 elementary school-age children referred for treatment of their children's chronic inattention, impulsivity, and restlessness were randomly assigned to one of three groups: behavioral parent training, self-instructional parent training, or a parent support group. Outcome measures collected prior to and after treatment and at a 1-month follow-up included a parent-report measure of child behavioral problems in the home, parent-report of behavior problem pervasiveness across home settings, and a teacher-report measure of school behavior. The integrity of treatment procedures was assessed via process inventories completed by parents following each session and by expert ratings of session audiotapes. No systematic differences between conditions were noted with respect to the group leader's style, and integrity of the treatment groups was validated by the expert audiotape ratings. The results indicated that self-instructional and behavioral parent training appeared to produce significant reductions in parent-rated measures of global behavior problems and ADHD-related behaviors which were maintained at 1-month follow-up. There was no generalization of treatment effects to the school setting for any group. The results suggest that self-instructional parent training is an effective treatment for ADHD children.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Parenting -- Study and teaching.; Parent and child.; Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Psychology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Morris, Richard

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleEffects of parent training on children's Attention Deficit Disorder: A comparative outcome study.en_US
dc.creatorCollier, Scott Jefferyen_US
dc.contributor.authorCollier, Scott Jefferyen_US
dc.date.issued1989en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractPrevious research has clearly established the efficacy of behavioral parent training approaches for the treatment of Attention-deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). The purpose of this study was to examine the efficacy of a parent training program utilizing cognitive-behavioral strategies of self-instruction with ADHD children. Parents of 35 elementary school-age children referred for treatment of their children's chronic inattention, impulsivity, and restlessness were randomly assigned to one of three groups: behavioral parent training, self-instructional parent training, or a parent support group. Outcome measures collected prior to and after treatment and at a 1-month follow-up included a parent-report measure of child behavioral problems in the home, parent-report of behavior problem pervasiveness across home settings, and a teacher-report measure of school behavior. The integrity of treatment procedures was assessed via process inventories completed by parents following each session and by expert ratings of session audiotapes. No systematic differences between conditions were noted with respect to the group leader's style, and integrity of the treatment groups was validated by the expert audiotape ratings. The results indicated that self-instructional and behavioral parent training appeared to produce significant reductions in parent-rated measures of global behavior problems and ADHD-related behaviors which were maintained at 1-month follow-up. There was no generalization of treatment effects to the school setting for any group. The results suggest that self-instructional parent training is an effective treatment for ADHD children.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectParenting -- Study and teaching.en_US
dc.subjectParent and child.en_US
dc.subjectAttention-deficit hyperactivity disorder.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMorris, Richarden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRosser, Rosemaryen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDomino, Georgeen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBeutler, Larryen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberArkowitz, Harold S.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest8915951en_US
dc.identifier.oclc702670014en_US
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