The DNA-damaging effect of bile acids and the protective effect of cellulose.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184639
Title:
The DNA-damaging effect of bile acids and the protective effect of cellulose.
Author:
Cheah, Peh Yean.
Issue Date:
1989
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Colon cancer is the second most common type of cancer in the United States. Its incidence is linked epidemiologically to high levels of bile acids in the feces. Bile acids have been implicated as promotors and cocarcinogens in the etiology of colon cancer and as comutagens and mutagens in bacteria. These observations suggest the hypothesis that bile acids may interact directly with DNA. Using agarose gel electrophoresis we showed that bile acids convert covalently closed circular plasmid DNA to the open circular form, indicating strand breakage. We next treated the single stranded circular DNA of phage M13 with bile acids and found that the transfection efficiency of this DNA declined up to a thousand-fold. The concentrations of bile acids used were of the same magnitude as the fecal bile acid concentrations found in colorectal cancer patients. This inactivation was largely prevented when the bile acids were pretreated with cellulose fiber.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Bile acids.; DNA damage.; Cellulose fibers.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Genetics; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Bernstein, Harris

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe DNA-damaging effect of bile acids and the protective effect of cellulose.en_US
dc.creatorCheah, Peh Yean.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCheah, Peh Yean.en_US
dc.date.issued1989en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractColon cancer is the second most common type of cancer in the United States. Its incidence is linked epidemiologically to high levels of bile acids in the feces. Bile acids have been implicated as promotors and cocarcinogens in the etiology of colon cancer and as comutagens and mutagens in bacteria. These observations suggest the hypothesis that bile acids may interact directly with DNA. Using agarose gel electrophoresis we showed that bile acids convert covalently closed circular plasmid DNA to the open circular form, indicating strand breakage. We next treated the single stranded circular DNA of phage M13 with bile acids and found that the transfection efficiency of this DNA declined up to a thousand-fold. The concentrations of bile acids used were of the same magnitude as the fecal bile acid concentrations found in colorectal cancer patients. This inactivation was largely prevented when the bile acids were pretreated with cellulose fiber.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBile acids.en_US
dc.subjectDNA damage.en_US
dc.subjectCellulose fibers.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGeneticsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBernstein, Harrisen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWard, Oscaren_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDenise, Sueen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCress, Anneen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGensler, Helenen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8915950en_US
dc.identifier.oclc702148437en_US
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