Population and community ecology of small mammals from tropical deciduous and arroyo forests in western Mexico.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184638
Title:
Population and community ecology of small mammals from tropical deciduous and arroyo forests in western Mexico.
Author:
Ceballos Gonzalez, Gerardo Jorge.
Issue Date:
1989
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The natural history, population dynamics, and community ecology of five small mammals from tropical deciduous and semideciduous (arroyo) forests were studied in western Mexico. I evaluated the influence of habitat heterogeneity and productivity on species diversity, population dynamics, and patterns of resource utilization. I expected higher biomass and species diversity and denser populations in the more complex and productive arroyo forest than in the deciduous forest. Species diversity was higher in the arroyo forest but total biomass, population density and fluctuations were very similar in both forests, despite strong differences in habitat heterogeneity and productivity. Reproduction of all species was associated to seasonality in food availability. Populations of all the species had qualitatively similar temporal patterns of reproduction and population fluctuations because they used similar food resources. Peaks in reproduction and population densities coincided with peaks in food production, suggesting that food availability is a limiting factor. Species differed in variables affecting resource utilization such as body mass, diet, and habitat selection. Results indicate that food resource partitioning and macro and microhabitat preferences permit coexistence. This study suggests that habitat heterogeneity and productivity have a profound influence in population and community ecology of small mammals in the Neotropics.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Mammals -- Mexico -- Jalisco.; Forest ecology -- Mexico -- Jalisco.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Ecology and Evolutionary Biology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Vleck, David J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titlePopulation and community ecology of small mammals from tropical deciduous and arroyo forests in western Mexico.en_US
dc.creatorCeballos Gonzalez, Gerardo Jorge.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCeballos Gonzalez, Gerardo Jorge.en_US
dc.date.issued1989en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe natural history, population dynamics, and community ecology of five small mammals from tropical deciduous and semideciduous (arroyo) forests were studied in western Mexico. I evaluated the influence of habitat heterogeneity and productivity on species diversity, population dynamics, and patterns of resource utilization. I expected higher biomass and species diversity and denser populations in the more complex and productive arroyo forest than in the deciduous forest. Species diversity was higher in the arroyo forest but total biomass, population density and fluctuations were very similar in both forests, despite strong differences in habitat heterogeneity and productivity. Reproduction of all species was associated to seasonality in food availability. Populations of all the species had qualitatively similar temporal patterns of reproduction and population fluctuations because they used similar food resources. Peaks in reproduction and population densities coincided with peaks in food production, suggesting that food availability is a limiting factor. Species differed in variables affecting resource utilization such as body mass, diet, and habitat selection. Results indicate that food resource partitioning and macro and microhabitat preferences permit coexistence. This study suggests that habitat heterogeneity and productivity have a profound influence in population and community ecology of small mammals in the Neotropics.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectMammals -- Mexico -- Jalisco.en_US
dc.subjectForest ecology -- Mexico -- Jalisco.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEcology and Evolutionary Biologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorVleck, David J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMartin, Paul S.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberStrauss, Richard E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDavis, Russellen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8915949en_US
dc.identifier.oclc702148377en_US
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