Numerical investigation of transition control of a flat plate boundary layer.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184621
Title:
Numerical investigation of transition control of a flat plate boundary layer.
Author:
Kral, Linda Dee.
Issue Date:
1988
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
A numerical model has been developed for investigating boundary layer transition control for a three-dimensional flat plate boundary layer. Control of a periodically forced boundary layer in an incompressible fluid is studied using surface heating techniques. The spatially evolving boundary layer is simulated. The Navier-Stokes and energy equations are integrated using a fully implicit finite difference/spectral method. The Navier-Stokes equations are in vorticity-velocity form and are coupled with the energy equation through the viscosity dependence on temperature. Both passive and active methods of control by surface heating are investigated. In passive methods of control, wall heating is employed to alter the stability characteristics of the mean flow. Both uniform and nonuniform surface temperature distributions are studied. In the active control investigations, temperature perturbations are introduced locally along finite heater strips to directly attenuate the instability waves in the flow. A feedback control loop is employed in which a downstream sensor is used to monitor wall shear stress fluctuations. Passive control of small amplitude two-dimensional Tollmien-Schlichting waves and three-dimensional oblique waves are numerically simulated with both uniform and nonuniform passive heating applied. Strong reductions in both amplitude levels and amplification rates are achieved. Active control of small amplitude two-dimensional and three-dimensional disturbances is also numerically simulated. With proper phase control, in phase reinforcement and out of phase attenuation is demonstrated. A receptivity study is performed to study how localized temperature perturbations are generated into Tollmien-Schlichting waves. It is shown that narrow heater strips are more receptive in that they maximize the amplitude level of the disturbances in the flow. It is also found that the local temperature fluctuations cause mainly a strong normal gradient in spanwise vorticity. Control of the early stages of the nonlinear breakdown process is also investigated. Uniform passive control is applied to both the fundamental and sub-harmonic routes to turbulence. A strong reduction in amplitude levels and growth rates results. In particular, the three-dimensional growth rates are significantly reduced below the uncontrolled levels. Active control of the fundamental breakdown process is also numerically simulated. Control is achieved using either a two-dimensional or three-dimensional control input.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Boundary layer.; Turbulent boundary layer.; Boundary layer control.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Fasel, Hermann F.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleNumerical investigation of transition control of a flat plate boundary layer.en_US
dc.creatorKral, Linda Dee.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKral, Linda Dee.en_US
dc.date.issued1988en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractA numerical model has been developed for investigating boundary layer transition control for a three-dimensional flat plate boundary layer. Control of a periodically forced boundary layer in an incompressible fluid is studied using surface heating techniques. The spatially evolving boundary layer is simulated. The Navier-Stokes and energy equations are integrated using a fully implicit finite difference/spectral method. The Navier-Stokes equations are in vorticity-velocity form and are coupled with the energy equation through the viscosity dependence on temperature. Both passive and active methods of control by surface heating are investigated. In passive methods of control, wall heating is employed to alter the stability characteristics of the mean flow. Both uniform and nonuniform surface temperature distributions are studied. In the active control investigations, temperature perturbations are introduced locally along finite heater strips to directly attenuate the instability waves in the flow. A feedback control loop is employed in which a downstream sensor is used to monitor wall shear stress fluctuations. Passive control of small amplitude two-dimensional Tollmien-Schlichting waves and three-dimensional oblique waves are numerically simulated with both uniform and nonuniform passive heating applied. Strong reductions in both amplitude levels and amplification rates are achieved. Active control of small amplitude two-dimensional and three-dimensional disturbances is also numerically simulated. With proper phase control, in phase reinforcement and out of phase attenuation is demonstrated. A receptivity study is performed to study how localized temperature perturbations are generated into Tollmien-Schlichting waves. It is shown that narrow heater strips are more receptive in that they maximize the amplitude level of the disturbances in the flow. It is also found that the local temperature fluctuations cause mainly a strong normal gradient in spanwise vorticity. Control of the early stages of the nonlinear breakdown process is also investigated. Uniform passive control is applied to both the fundamental and sub-harmonic routes to turbulence. A strong reduction in amplitude levels and growth rates results. In particular, the three-dimensional growth rates are significantly reduced below the uncontrolled levels. Active control of the fundamental breakdown process is also numerically simulated. Control is achieved using either a two-dimensional or three-dimensional control input.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBoundary layer.en_US
dc.subjectTurbulent boundary layer.en_US
dc.subjectBoundary layer control.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAerospace and Mechanical Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorFasel, Hermann F.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberChen, C. F.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFunk, K.-Y.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest8907965en_US
dc.identifier.oclc701920933en_US
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