Imaginary audience responses among Anglo and Mexican-American early adolescents.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184617
Title:
Imaginary audience responses among Anglo and Mexican-American early adolescents.
Author:
Johnson, Alberta Clark.
Issue Date:
1988
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study examined selected psychometric properties of the Situation Scale for Adolescents (SISA), a Dutch instrument and extension of the Imaginary Audience Scale (IAS) which purports to measure presence of an imaginary audience. The SISA, plus several additional items, was administered to 273 adolescents in grades 7 and 8 in order to investigate the imaginary audience phenomenon in terms of gender, ethnicity, and dating pattern. The ethnic composition of the sample was approximately 52% Anglo, 38% Mexican-American, and 10% other. The SISA had high estimates of internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha) and adequate evidence of convergent and discriminant validity with the adolescents. It was determined that the SISA is more reliable than the IAS and that it is suitable for use with American subjects. Factorial analyses of variance indicated that females demonstrated significantly higher imaginary audience responses than males. There were no significant differences in SISA means between Anglo and Mexican-American subjects. Adolescents reporting previous dating experience exhibited significantly lower sensitivity to the imaginary audience than those adolescents who had not yet begun to date. The latter finding lends support to Elkind's hypothesis that social experiences (e.g., dating) help diminish the imaginary audience, a manifestation of adolescent egocentrism.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Educational Foundations and Administration; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Christopherson, Victor A.; Brainerd, Charles

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleImaginary audience responses among Anglo and Mexican-American early adolescents.en_US
dc.creatorJohnson, Alberta Clark.en_US
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Alberta Clark.en_US
dc.date.issued1988en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study examined selected psychometric properties of the Situation Scale for Adolescents (SISA), a Dutch instrument and extension of the Imaginary Audience Scale (IAS) which purports to measure presence of an imaginary audience. The SISA, plus several additional items, was administered to 273 adolescents in grades 7 and 8 in order to investigate the imaginary audience phenomenon in terms of gender, ethnicity, and dating pattern. The ethnic composition of the sample was approximately 52% Anglo, 38% Mexican-American, and 10% other. The SISA had high estimates of internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha) and adequate evidence of convergent and discriminant validity with the adolescents. It was determined that the SISA is more reliable than the IAS and that it is suitable for use with American subjects. Factorial analyses of variance indicated that females demonstrated significantly higher imaginary audience responses than males. There were no significant differences in SISA means between Anglo and Mexican-American subjects. Adolescents reporting previous dating experience exhibited significantly lower sensitivity to the imaginary audience than those adolescents who had not yet begun to date. The latter finding lends support to Elkind's hypothesis that social experiences (e.g., dating) help diminish the imaginary audience, a manifestation of adolescent egocentrism.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Foundations and Administrationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorChristopherson, Victor A.en_US
dc.contributor.advisorBrainerd, Charlesen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberChristiansen, Harleyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMishra, Shitalaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8907961en_US
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