Cooperative learning with four gifted and talented students: A case study focusing on interpersonal skills.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184615
Title:
Cooperative learning with four gifted and talented students: A case study focusing on interpersonal skills.
Author:
Hooker, Sharon Kay Roper.
Issue Date:
1988
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This investigator studied 4 gifted 9- and 10-year-old subjects as they took part in investigator-designed cooperative learning activities during 1 school year. The purpose of this study was twofold: (a) to describe changes in the subjects' interpersonal skills and (b) to describe changes in their attitudes regarding interpersonal skills, school, self, and others. Results of surveys and transcripts of the subjects' dialogue relating to four clusters of interpersonal skills, psychological health, and attitudes toward school were analyzed and discussed. Three of the 4 subjects showed positive changes in their interpersonal skills. The communication modes occurring most frequently among the subjects were (a) interrupting, (b) expanding information beyond what is known, (c) admitting limited knowledge, (d) paraphrasing, (e) persuading, and (f) elaborating on ideas. Acceptance and support of others was developed and demonstrated very successfully by 3 of the 4 subjects and to a lesser degree by the 4th subject. All subjects increased the number of people they considered to be friends, including the number of cross-ethnic friendships. For all 4 subjects, the number of people who considered the subjects as friends increased as well. All 4 subjects experienced conflict and relationship problems during their cooperative learning activities, and no two people approached the resolution of these issues the same way. Attempts to resolve the problems included (a) shaming and chastizing the group member(s), (b) ignoring the inappropriate behavior, (c) excluding the group member from the interaction, (d) withdrawing or threatening to withdraw from the group, (e) trying to understand the other's perspective, and (f) changing the mode of operation that was at issue. The psychological health of 2 of the subjects was superior. The third subject had a satisfactory adjustment, and the fourth did not change his behavior significantly. All four subjects had a favorable attitude toward school and toward cooperative learning. Most of the subjects felt that (a) they had helped others, (b) they had received help, (c) their group work was better than their individual work, and (d) the quality of their group work was no worse than that of their individual work. Most of the subjects felt better about themselves after working on a cooperative learning team.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Special Education and Rehabilitation; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Maker, June

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleCooperative learning with four gifted and talented students: A case study focusing on interpersonal skills.en_US
dc.creatorHooker, Sharon Kay Roper.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHooker, Sharon Kay Roper.en_US
dc.date.issued1988en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis investigator studied 4 gifted 9- and 10-year-old subjects as they took part in investigator-designed cooperative learning activities during 1 school year. The purpose of this study was twofold: (a) to describe changes in the subjects' interpersonal skills and (b) to describe changes in their attitudes regarding interpersonal skills, school, self, and others. Results of surveys and transcripts of the subjects' dialogue relating to four clusters of interpersonal skills, psychological health, and attitudes toward school were analyzed and discussed. Three of the 4 subjects showed positive changes in their interpersonal skills. The communication modes occurring most frequently among the subjects were (a) interrupting, (b) expanding information beyond what is known, (c) admitting limited knowledge, (d) paraphrasing, (e) persuading, and (f) elaborating on ideas. Acceptance and support of others was developed and demonstrated very successfully by 3 of the 4 subjects and to a lesser degree by the 4th subject. All subjects increased the number of people they considered to be friends, including the number of cross-ethnic friendships. For all 4 subjects, the number of people who considered the subjects as friends increased as well. All 4 subjects experienced conflict and relationship problems during their cooperative learning activities, and no two people approached the resolution of these issues the same way. Attempts to resolve the problems included (a) shaming and chastizing the group member(s), (b) ignoring the inappropriate behavior, (c) excluding the group member from the interaction, (d) withdrawing or threatening to withdraw from the group, (e) trying to understand the other's perspective, and (f) changing the mode of operation that was at issue. The psychological health of 2 of the subjects was superior. The third subject had a satisfactory adjustment, and the fourth did not change his behavior significantly. All four subjects had a favorable attitude toward school and toward cooperative learning. Most of the subjects felt that (a) they had helped others, (b) they had received help, (c) their group work was better than their individual work, and (d) the quality of their group work was no worse than that of their individual work. Most of the subjects felt better about themselves after working on a cooperative learning team.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSpecial Education and Rehabilitationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMaker, Juneen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHealey, Williamen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBeeker, Ruthen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8907959en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.