Assessing the usefulness of domain and methodological tutorials for novice users employing an expert system as an advice-giving tool.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184607
Title:
Assessing the usefulness of domain and methodological tutorials for novice users employing an expert system as an advice-giving tool.
Author:
Cass, Kimberly Ann.
Issue Date:
1988
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this dissertation is to examine the impact of domain and methodological tutorials on the attitude and performance of end-users who are neither well-versed in the domain area nor well-versed with an expert system which is designed to assist them in solving software selection tasks. With respect to these tasks and the mechanism for accomplishing them, the end-users can be categorized as "non-technical users." The design of this experiment was a 2 x 2 full factorial laboratory experiment employing eighty novice users as subjects. Each of the experimental subjects was randomly assigned to one of the four treatment groups corresponding to receipt or lack of receipt of tutorials concerning the problem domain and methodology employed by an expert system. The results of this research indicate that there is a significant interaction between receiving the application and expert system tutorial videos; better performance in terms of correct categorization of problems was observed in subjects who saw either both or neither video whereas worse performance was observed in subjects who saw only one video. In general, the video treatments were unrelated to a variety of attitude measures applied to the subjects. However, it was found that prior attitudes towards the use of computers were significantly related to the majority of the (posttest) attitude measures. Further, the general pattern was for attitudes towards computers to improve as a result of undergoing the experimental process with the viewing of the expert system video to be significant in the level of improvement.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Computer literacy.; Intelligent tutoring systems -- Research.; Computer science -- Intelligent tutoring systems.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Business Administration; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Nunamaker, J. F.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleAssessing the usefulness of domain and methodological tutorials for novice users employing an expert system as an advice-giving tool.en_US
dc.creatorCass, Kimberly Ann.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCass, Kimberly Ann.en_US
dc.date.issued1988en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this dissertation is to examine the impact of domain and methodological tutorials on the attitude and performance of end-users who are neither well-versed in the domain area nor well-versed with an expert system which is designed to assist them in solving software selection tasks. With respect to these tasks and the mechanism for accomplishing them, the end-users can be categorized as "non-technical users." The design of this experiment was a 2 x 2 full factorial laboratory experiment employing eighty novice users as subjects. Each of the experimental subjects was randomly assigned to one of the four treatment groups corresponding to receipt or lack of receipt of tutorials concerning the problem domain and methodology employed by an expert system. The results of this research indicate that there is a significant interaction between receiving the application and expert system tutorial videos; better performance in terms of correct categorization of problems was observed in subjects who saw either both or neither video whereas worse performance was observed in subjects who saw only one video. In general, the video treatments were unrelated to a variety of attitude measures applied to the subjects. However, it was found that prior attitudes towards the use of computers were significantly related to the majority of the (posttest) attitude measures. Further, the general pattern was for attitudes towards computers to improve as a result of undergoing the experimental process with the viewing of the expert system video to be significant in the level of improvement.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectComputer literacy.en_US
dc.subjectIntelligent tutoring systems -- Research.en_US
dc.subjectComputer science -- Intelligent tutoring systems.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineBusiness Administrationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorNunamaker, J. F.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPingry, David E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWeber, E. Sueen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8907952en_US
dc.identifier.oclc701927565en_US
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