Asymptomatic infections of Euphorbia lathyris by Macrophomina phaseolina.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184594
Title:
Asymptomatic infections of Euphorbia lathyris by Macrophomina phaseolina.
Author:
Himmel, Phyllis Terry
Issue Date:
1988
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
In November of 1984 and 1985, Euphorbia lathyris was planted into a field naturally infested with Macrophomina phaseolina located at the Campbell Avenue Farm in Tucson, Arizona. Plants without foliar symptoms and rhizosphere soil were sampled regularly from emergence until the following May or June. Soil rhizosphere populations ranged from 0.7-3.0 cfu/g soil in 1985 to 8.0-24.1 cfu/g soil in 1986, and did not change significantly over either growing season (P > 0.05). Both the incidence of disease and the number of infection sites per cm of root increased significantly (P < 0.05) over each growing season and were not related to rhizosphere soil populations of M. phaseolina (P > 0.05). The distribution of infection sites along the tap root over both growing seasons remained the same in that most were located in the top 0-7 cm of tap root. Infected E. lathyris without apparent symptoms were subjected to low-water and high-temperature stress treatments in growth chambers. Root infection was not found to be dependent upon any stress. Lesion development was significantly dependent upon the imposition of any stress treatment, and further root colonization was significantly dependent upon low-water stress (P < 0.05). M. phaseolina was consistently recovered from asymptomatic roots. A consistently lower leaf water potential was measured on infected E. lathyris than from non-infected controls when no stress treatment was applied. Polyclonal antisera made against hyphae and microsclerotia of M. phaseolina was not successful in detecting this pathogen in E. lathyris by I-ELISA. Antisera applied to fresh thin sections of infected plant tissue was effective in staining hyphae of M. phaseolina when used with a second antibody conjugated to fluorescence isothiocyanate or to an enzyme (to which a substrate was added to "stain" hyphae).
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Euphorbia -- Diseases and pests.; Macrophomina phaseolina.; Charcoal rot.; Arid regions agriculture -- Arizona.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Plant Pathology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Alcorn, Stanley M.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleAsymptomatic infections of Euphorbia lathyris by Macrophomina phaseolina.en_US
dc.creatorHimmel, Phyllis Terryen_US
dc.contributor.authorHimmel, Phyllis Terryen_US
dc.date.issued1988en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn November of 1984 and 1985, Euphorbia lathyris was planted into a field naturally infested with Macrophomina phaseolina located at the Campbell Avenue Farm in Tucson, Arizona. Plants without foliar symptoms and rhizosphere soil were sampled regularly from emergence until the following May or June. Soil rhizosphere populations ranged from 0.7-3.0 cfu/g soil in 1985 to 8.0-24.1 cfu/g soil in 1986, and did not change significantly over either growing season (P > 0.05). Both the incidence of disease and the number of infection sites per cm of root increased significantly (P < 0.05) over each growing season and were not related to rhizosphere soil populations of M. phaseolina (P > 0.05). The distribution of infection sites along the tap root over both growing seasons remained the same in that most were located in the top 0-7 cm of tap root. Infected E. lathyris without apparent symptoms were subjected to low-water and high-temperature stress treatments in growth chambers. Root infection was not found to be dependent upon any stress. Lesion development was significantly dependent upon the imposition of any stress treatment, and further root colonization was significantly dependent upon low-water stress (P < 0.05). M. phaseolina was consistently recovered from asymptomatic roots. A consistently lower leaf water potential was measured on infected E. lathyris than from non-infected controls when no stress treatment was applied. Polyclonal antisera made against hyphae and microsclerotia of M. phaseolina was not successful in detecting this pathogen in E. lathyris by I-ELISA. Antisera applied to fresh thin sections of infected plant tissue was effective in staining hyphae of M. phaseolina when used with a second antibody conjugated to fluorescence isothiocyanate or to an enzyme (to which a substrate was added to "stain" hyphae).en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEuphorbia -- Diseases and pests.en_US
dc.subjectMacrophomina phaseolina.en_US
dc.subjectCharcoal rot.en_US
dc.subjectArid regions agriculture -- Arizona.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePlant Pathologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorAlcorn, Stanley M.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest8907405en_US
dc.identifier.oclc701903617en_US
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