CURRICULAR DIFFERENCES IN OFFENDER-RELATED PROGRAMS OF POSTSECONDARY INSTITUTIONS.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184592
Title:
CURRICULAR DIFFERENCES IN OFFENDER-RELATED PROGRAMS OF POSTSECONDARY INSTITUTIONS.
Author:
MERREN, JOHN JAY.
Issue Date:
1982
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
In order to determine if curricula in postsecondary programs for offenders possess special content included specifically for these students, a comprehensive review of the literature on postsecondary correctional education was conducted, followed by the development of five case studies of offender-related programs. To decide which programs were most appropriate for the study, a panel of national and regional authorities on the subject was assembled to nominate institutions for study. The responses of the panelists were quantified, and produced these nominations: (1) Southeastern Illinois College and its program at the Vienna Correctional Center; (2) The University of Washington Resident Release Project, which consists of inmates living on campus and attending classes; (3) Rhode Island College's Project OPTIONS, which is currently in suspension for lack of funds, although it has the most specialized credit offerings; (4) Hartnell College which, at the state prison in Soledad, California, has a non-credit program with courses specifically tailored to meet inmate needs and interests; and (5) Cuesta College, which has a program managed by a prison educator. The differences which exist in course content are largely a result of administrative planning, but some social science faculty report that they alter their courses to meet student needs and interests. Virtually no elements are added on the basis of a published theory of principle, but most special content exists to integrate the offender into society after a period of incarceration. Although two of the programs studied have been evaluated on the basis of recidivism figures, the studies have flaws. Evaluation is, therefore, an area in need of further study. Several specific types of related research projects might answer questions raised by this study, and the use of establishd curricular theories in planning programs would provide an empirical framework for correctional postsecondary education. Also of particular interest would be basing program mission on the welfare of society in general rather than considering only the needs of offenders.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Crime and criminals -- Education -- United States.; Prisoners -- Education -- United States.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Higher Education; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleCURRICULAR DIFFERENCES IN OFFENDER-RELATED PROGRAMS OF POSTSECONDARY INSTITUTIONS.en_US
dc.creatorMERREN, JOHN JAY.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMERREN, JOHN JAY.en_US
dc.date.issued1982en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn order to determine if curricula in postsecondary programs for offenders possess special content included specifically for these students, a comprehensive review of the literature on postsecondary correctional education was conducted, followed by the development of five case studies of offender-related programs. To decide which programs were most appropriate for the study, a panel of national and regional authorities on the subject was assembled to nominate institutions for study. The responses of the panelists were quantified, and produced these nominations: (1) Southeastern Illinois College and its program at the Vienna Correctional Center; (2) The University of Washington Resident Release Project, which consists of inmates living on campus and attending classes; (3) Rhode Island College's Project OPTIONS, which is currently in suspension for lack of funds, although it has the most specialized credit offerings; (4) Hartnell College which, at the state prison in Soledad, California, has a non-credit program with courses specifically tailored to meet inmate needs and interests; and (5) Cuesta College, which has a program managed by a prison educator. The differences which exist in course content are largely a result of administrative planning, but some social science faculty report that they alter their courses to meet student needs and interests. Virtually no elements are added on the basis of a published theory of principle, but most special content exists to integrate the offender into society after a period of incarceration. Although two of the programs studied have been evaluated on the basis of recidivism figures, the studies have flaws. Evaluation is, therefore, an area in need of further study. Several specific types of related research projects might answer questions raised by this study, and the use of establishd curricular theories in planning programs would provide an empirical framework for correctional postsecondary education. Also of particular interest would be basing program mission on the welfare of society in general rather than considering only the needs of offenders.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectCrime and criminals -- Education -- United States.en_US
dc.subjectPrisoners -- Education -- United States.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHigher Educationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8227362en_US
dc.identifier.oclc682926790en_US
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