Adolescent substance use as mediated by self reporting of motivation and associated circumstances.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184588
Title:
Adolescent substance use as mediated by self reporting of motivation and associated circumstances.
Author:
Gaus, Joseph Stelmach.
Issue Date:
1988
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of crack use among adolescents living in a large southwestern city, and to study relationships between crack use and marijuana use. This included investigating reasons as well as associated circumstances for both crack use and marijuana use; and whether marijuana use would predict crack use. High school seniors (N = 269) were asked to disclose information about their marijuana (and hashish) use and non-use, and crack use and non-use. Preliminary computation of the results revealed only 2.6% of respondents indicating crack use; thus statistical analysis of that data was not warranted. Computation of the results indicated 34% of respondents reporting marijuana use; therefore, the focus of the study shifted to marijuana exclusively, resulting in a final sample size of n = 92. Two specific phenomena were investigated: crack use and marijuana use. Discriminant analysis of the data was performed to (1) measure differences in frequencies (indicated as "seldom" and "occasionally") of respondents' marijuana use a predicted by particular circumstances and reasons for its use; and (2) to measure whether students' marijuana use would predict crack use. Statistical significance using Chi square and canonical correlation was calculated for each set of variables. Chi square (5) = 46.10 yielded significance (p <.001) for five of nine circumstances as predictors of marijuana use: "At a party" was the best discriminating variable. Chi square (4) = 36.73 yielded significance (p <.001) for four of thirteen reasons as predictors of marijuana use; "To get high" was the best discriminating reasons variable. The study succeeded in determining several drug-related attributions: (1) there is one-third less prevalence of crack use among adolescents in the area being researched than is reported nationally; (2) there is about the same prevalence of marijuana use as nationally reported; (3) there are specific associated circumstances which predict frequency of marijuana use; and (4) there are specific associated reasons which predict frequency of marijuana use. Finally, although it is not data-based, marijuana appears to be a predictor of crack use, i.e., all seven crack users reported having used marijuana prior to crack use.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Youth -- Drug use.; Drug abuse -- Forecasting.; Drug abuse -- Social aspects.; Crack (Drug); Marijuana.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Counseling and Guidance; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Lauver, Phil
Committee Chair:
Lauver, Phil

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleAdolescent substance use as mediated by self reporting of motivation and associated circumstances.en_US
dc.creatorGaus, Joseph Stelmach.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGaus, Joseph Stelmach.en_US
dc.date.issued1988en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of crack use among adolescents living in a large southwestern city, and to study relationships between crack use and marijuana use. This included investigating reasons as well as associated circumstances for both crack use and marijuana use; and whether marijuana use would predict crack use. High school seniors (N = 269) were asked to disclose information about their marijuana (and hashish) use and non-use, and crack use and non-use. Preliminary computation of the results revealed only 2.6% of respondents indicating crack use; thus statistical analysis of that data was not warranted. Computation of the results indicated 34% of respondents reporting marijuana use; therefore, the focus of the study shifted to marijuana exclusively, resulting in a final sample size of n = 92. Two specific phenomena were investigated: crack use and marijuana use. Discriminant analysis of the data was performed to (1) measure differences in frequencies (indicated as "seldom" and "occasionally") of respondents' marijuana use a predicted by particular circumstances and reasons for its use; and (2) to measure whether students' marijuana use would predict crack use. Statistical significance using Chi square and canonical correlation was calculated for each set of variables. Chi square (5) = 46.10 yielded significance (p <.001) for five of nine circumstances as predictors of marijuana use: "At a party" was the best discriminating variable. Chi square (4) = 36.73 yielded significance (p <.001) for four of thirteen reasons as predictors of marijuana use; "To get high" was the best discriminating reasons variable. The study succeeded in determining several drug-related attributions: (1) there is one-third less prevalence of crack use among adolescents in the area being researched than is reported nationally; (2) there is about the same prevalence of marijuana use as nationally reported; (3) there are specific associated circumstances which predict frequency of marijuana use; and (4) there are specific associated reasons which predict frequency of marijuana use. Finally, although it is not data-based, marijuana appears to be a predictor of crack use, i.e., all seven crack users reported having used marijuana prior to crack use.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectYouth -- Drug use.en_US
dc.subjectDrug abuse -- Forecasting.en_US
dc.subjectDrug abuse -- Social aspects.en_US
dc.subjectCrack (Drug)en_US
dc.subjectMarijuana.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCounseling and Guidanceen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorLauver, Philen_US
dc.contributor.chairLauver, Philen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberErickson, Dicken_US
dc.contributor.committeememberChristiansen, Harleyen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8907400en_US
dc.identifier.oclc701899645en_US
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