Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184587
Title:
Resolving the problem of Japanese 'no': An analysis of words.
Author:
Yamahashi, Sachiko
Issue Date:
1988
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The main purpose of this study is to determine the function of no and its place in Japanese Grammar in order to resolve heretofore unsolved problems concerning no. Initiated with this purpose, this dissertation presents an analysis of Words in Japanese with the idea of linguistic analysis based on functors and arguments within the framework largely drawn from Steele (1986), (1987), and (1988). For the formation of Words, we propose a set of rules which is defined in terms of a set of syntactic features which diverges considerably from previous works. Features in our work are not associated with such terms as N or V, but with finite closed-class elements such as particles and tense, from which features it is possible to predict the semantic generalization. Further, it is demonstrated that finite closed-class elements have an important syntactic function associated with them. Case particles are now considered as occupying a position which prenominal determiners have been taking, in the sense that they are a necessary element in an NP. However, they are not considered as a Word, but as part of the morphology of a Word, like other particles. This involves the idea that a Word is determined purely on phonological grounds as a pitch unit. On the base of these fundamental assumptions, our new approach to no enables us to account for every occurrence of no simply and elegantly.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Japanese language -- Morphology.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Linguistics; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Steele, Susan

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleResolving the problem of Japanese 'no': An analysis of words.en_US
dc.creatorYamahashi, Sachikoen_US
dc.contributor.authorYamahashi, Sachikoen_US
dc.date.issued1988en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe main purpose of this study is to determine the function of no and its place in Japanese Grammar in order to resolve heretofore unsolved problems concerning no. Initiated with this purpose, this dissertation presents an analysis of Words in Japanese with the idea of linguistic analysis based on functors and arguments within the framework largely drawn from Steele (1986), (1987), and (1988). For the formation of Words, we propose a set of rules which is defined in terms of a set of syntactic features which diverges considerably from previous works. Features in our work are not associated with such terms as N or V, but with finite closed-class elements such as particles and tense, from which features it is possible to predict the semantic generalization. Further, it is demonstrated that finite closed-class elements have an important syntactic function associated with them. Case particles are now considered as occupying a position which prenominal determiners have been taking, in the sense that they are a necessary element in an NP. However, they are not considered as a Word, but as part of the morphology of a Word, like other particles. This involves the idea that a Word is determined purely on phonological grounds as a pitch unit. On the base of these fundamental assumptions, our new approach to no enables us to account for every occurrence of no simply and elegantly.en_US
dc.description.noteDigitization note: p. 88 missing from both paper original and microfilm version; appears to be missing content.en
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectJapanese language -- Morphology.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineLinguisticsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSteele, Susanen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberOehrle, Richard T.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKitagawa, Chisatoen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBailey, Don C.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest8906397en_US
dc.identifier.oclc701552473en_US
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