Loneliness and psychological adjustment: A comparison among three ethnic groups.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184578
Title:
Loneliness and psychological adjustment: A comparison among three ethnic groups.
Author:
Kirkland, Shari Lynn
Issue Date:
1988
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
In the current study differences between lonely and nonlonely black, Hispanic, and white subjects were assessed in an attempt to discover any group variation and to highlight the potential importance of research using different ethnic groups. Loneliness was chosen as the focus because it is well researched, and likely to be a problem across groups. Previous research has demonstrated that lonely white subjects exhibit an internal, stable attribution style which is related to their loneliness and psychological distress. It was hypothesized that lonely ethnic minorities would exhibit a more external, unstable attribution style and, hence, fewer symptoms of psychological distress than lonely whites. This hypothesis was based on research indicating that (1) some ethnic minority groups exhibit a more external locus of control than whites, and (2) self-blaming tendencies exacerbate negative emotions, cognitions, and behaviors. The results did not support the hypothesis. Regardless of loneliness, black subjects scored highest on psychological adjustment and lowest on internal, stable attributions for negative events, whereas Hispanics scored at the other extreme. Loneliness correlated with internal, stable attributions for negative outcomes, and with psychological maladjustment, although the strength of these relationships varied with ethnicity. Implications of generalizing findings across groups were discussed.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Psychology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Arkowitz, Harold S.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleLoneliness and psychological adjustment: A comparison among three ethnic groups.en_US
dc.creatorKirkland, Shari Lynnen_US
dc.contributor.authorKirkland, Shari Lynnen_US
dc.date.issued1988en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn the current study differences between lonely and nonlonely black, Hispanic, and white subjects were assessed in an attempt to discover any group variation and to highlight the potential importance of research using different ethnic groups. Loneliness was chosen as the focus because it is well researched, and likely to be a problem across groups. Previous research has demonstrated that lonely white subjects exhibit an internal, stable attribution style which is related to their loneliness and psychological distress. It was hypothesized that lonely ethnic minorities would exhibit a more external, unstable attribution style and, hence, fewer symptoms of psychological distress than lonely whites. This hypothesis was based on research indicating that (1) some ethnic minority groups exhibit a more external locus of control than whites, and (2) self-blaming tendencies exacerbate negative emotions, cognitions, and behaviors. The results did not support the hypothesis. Regardless of loneliness, black subjects scored highest on psychological adjustment and lowest on internal, stable attributions for negative events, whereas Hispanics scored at the other extreme. Loneliness correlated with internal, stable attributions for negative outcomes, and with psychological maladjustment, although the strength of these relationships varied with ethnicity. Implications of generalizing findings across groups were discussed.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorArkowitz, Harold S.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDomino, Georgeen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGreenberg, Jeffen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSmith, Glennen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberIttelson, Billen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8906389en_US
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