THE USE OF SIMULATED PATIENTS IN THE TRAINING OF EMPATHY AND RESPECT IN PSYCHOTHERAPISTS.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184570
Title:
THE USE OF SIMULATED PATIENTS IN THE TRAINING OF EMPATHY AND RESPECT IN PSYCHOTHERAPISTS.
Author:
MAASKE, JON WALTER.
Issue Date:
1982
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study examined the use of a simulated patient, or programmed patient, to train clinical psychology graduate students to be empathic and respectful in the psychotherapeutic relationship. Twenty-five subjects were given a 50-minute training session with a simulated patient, an alternate training which consisted of viewing a video tape or were no-attention control subjects. The video tape used for the alternate training consisted of the section of "Three Approaches to Psychotherapy" in which Carl Rogers interviews the client, Gloria, followed by a discussion of empathy and respect. Training with the simulated client consisted of interviewing the "client" and receiving feedback from her. Pre-post empathy and respect skills were evaluated with Carkhuff's 5-point scales. Subjects' responses to recorded client statements were judged by two trained raters. Interjudge agreement ranged from .66 to .74. Analysis of variance revealed no significant difference between increases in empathy and respect for the three experimental groups. Subjects with more than one year of graduate clinical training profited significantly more (p = .05) from both training experiences than did subjects with less than one year of training. There was also a significant interaction between experimental training received and level of clinical experience, inexperienced subjects scoring higher with the simulated patient than with the video tape training. More advanced subjects scored higher with the video training than with the simulated patient training. Interview data indicated that the training with the simulated patient was perceived as useful and, in the case of more-experienced subjects, as being superior to the training with the video tape. Possible difficulties with the measurement of empathy and respect are discussed. The use of simulated patients is reviewed and the selection and training of simulated patients discussed in some depth.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Psychotherapy -- Research.; Simulated patients.; Empathy.; Respect.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Psychology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleTHE USE OF SIMULATED PATIENTS IN THE TRAINING OF EMPATHY AND RESPECT IN PSYCHOTHERAPISTS.en_US
dc.creatorMAASKE, JON WALTER.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMAASKE, JON WALTER.en_US
dc.date.issued1982en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study examined the use of a simulated patient, or programmed patient, to train clinical psychology graduate students to be empathic and respectful in the psychotherapeutic relationship. Twenty-five subjects were given a 50-minute training session with a simulated patient, an alternate training which consisted of viewing a video tape or were no-attention control subjects. The video tape used for the alternate training consisted of the section of "Three Approaches to Psychotherapy" in which Carl Rogers interviews the client, Gloria, followed by a discussion of empathy and respect. Training with the simulated client consisted of interviewing the "client" and receiving feedback from her. Pre-post empathy and respect skills were evaluated with Carkhuff's 5-point scales. Subjects' responses to recorded client statements were judged by two trained raters. Interjudge agreement ranged from .66 to .74. Analysis of variance revealed no significant difference between increases in empathy and respect for the three experimental groups. Subjects with more than one year of graduate clinical training profited significantly more (p = .05) from both training experiences than did subjects with less than one year of training. There was also a significant interaction between experimental training received and level of clinical experience, inexperienced subjects scoring higher with the simulated patient than with the video tape training. More advanced subjects scored higher with the video training than with the simulated patient training. Interview data indicated that the training with the simulated patient was perceived as useful and, in the case of more-experienced subjects, as being superior to the training with the video tape. Possible difficulties with the measurement of empathy and respect are discussed. The use of simulated patients is reviewed and the selection and training of simulated patients discussed in some depth.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPsychotherapy -- Research.en_US
dc.subjectSimulated patients.en_US
dc.subjectEmpathy.en_US
dc.subjectRespect.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8227360en_US
dc.identifier.oclc682952910en_US
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