Preservice orientation for child care workers: An investigation of content areas.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184565
Title:
Preservice orientation for child care workers: An investigation of content areas.
Author:
Brooks, Filomena Matia.
Issue Date:
1988
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study used a survey designed to identify content areas for preservice orientation for child care workers agreed upon by the educational community and the directors in the "trenches" where application of knowledge and theory is crucial to the provision of quality day care. The survey, devised from a review of the literature, elicited information about six content areas: Child Development, Communication and Interpersonal Skills, Environment, Curriculum, Health and Safety, and Nutrition. Participants were 88 Early Childhood Educators (ECE) and Child Care Practitioners (CCP). It contained 30 items to be rated on a five point scale. The interval scale ranged from 1 Strongly Disagree to 5 Strongly Agree. The survey instrument was field tested and revised. The responses were analyzed to identify differences in the judgment of participants concerning the content areas for preservice orientation for child care workers. A demographic profile was constructed from the data. Additional participant comments indicated the concerns of time, depth of content, identification of staff backgrounds and affordability. Collectively, the results of this study identified significant differences in the judgment of ECE and CCP groups regarding the content areas for preservice orientation training. The hypotheses were measured using parametric statistical measures--the t-test and the Pearson correlation. Only in the Child Development component was there a significant difference between the two groups. Participants reported that this area was not considered important since the child care worker needed to have this skill prior to being hired. No significant difference was found between the two groups for the other components: Communication, Interpersonal Skills, Environment, Curriculum, Health and Safety and Nutrition. The correlations between years of employment and judgment concerning the content areas were not statistically significant. The correlation between the groups and the subscales were not statically significant. The results support the researcher's selection of content areas to be included in preservice orientation and her recommendation that a preservice orientation package be developed to provide assistance to center directors who are responsible for training. States' preservice orientation requirements recommend number of hours and content. This study provides a rationale for specific content agreed upon by eminent theorists and practitioners.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Child care workers -- Training of -- United States.; Curriculum planning -- United States.
Degree Name:
Ed.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Teaching/Teacher Education; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Paul, Alice

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titlePreservice orientation for child care workers: An investigation of content areas.en_US
dc.creatorBrooks, Filomena Matia.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBrooks, Filomena Matia.en_US
dc.date.issued1988en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study used a survey designed to identify content areas for preservice orientation for child care workers agreed upon by the educational community and the directors in the "trenches" where application of knowledge and theory is crucial to the provision of quality day care. The survey, devised from a review of the literature, elicited information about six content areas: Child Development, Communication and Interpersonal Skills, Environment, Curriculum, Health and Safety, and Nutrition. Participants were 88 Early Childhood Educators (ECE) and Child Care Practitioners (CCP). It contained 30 items to be rated on a five point scale. The interval scale ranged from 1 Strongly Disagree to 5 Strongly Agree. The survey instrument was field tested and revised. The responses were analyzed to identify differences in the judgment of participants concerning the content areas for preservice orientation for child care workers. A demographic profile was constructed from the data. Additional participant comments indicated the concerns of time, depth of content, identification of staff backgrounds and affordability. Collectively, the results of this study identified significant differences in the judgment of ECE and CCP groups regarding the content areas for preservice orientation training. The hypotheses were measured using parametric statistical measures--the t-test and the Pearson correlation. Only in the Child Development component was there a significant difference between the two groups. Participants reported that this area was not considered important since the child care worker needed to have this skill prior to being hired. No significant difference was found between the two groups for the other components: Communication, Interpersonal Skills, Environment, Curriculum, Health and Safety and Nutrition. The correlations between years of employment and judgment concerning the content areas were not statistically significant. The correlation between the groups and the subscales were not statically significant. The results support the researcher's selection of content areas to be included in preservice orientation and her recommendation that a preservice orientation package be developed to provide assistance to center directors who are responsible for training. States' preservice orientation requirements recommend number of hours and content. This study provides a rationale for specific content agreed upon by eminent theorists and practitioners.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectChild care workers -- Training of -- United States.en_US
dc.subjectCurriculum planning -- United States.en_US
thesis.degree.nameEd.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineTeaching/Teacher Educationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorPaul, Aliceen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCox, Vivianen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRomero, Lupeen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberNewlon, Bettyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberChristensen, Oscaren_US
dc.identifier.proquest8906378en_US
dc.identifier.oclc701551702en_US
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