Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184531
Title:
Extending the measurement range of an optical surface profiler.
Author:
Cochran, Eugene Rowland, III.
Issue Date:
1988
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation investigates a method for extending the measurement range of an optical surface profiling instrument. The instrument examined in these experiments is a computer-controlled phase-modulated interference microscope. Because of its ability to measure surfaces with a high degree of vertical resolution as well as excellent lateral resolution, this instrument is one of the most favorable candidates for determining the microtopography of optical surfaces. However, the data acquired by the instrument are restricted to a finite lateral and vertical range. To overcome this restriction, the feasibility of a new testing technique is explored. By overlapping a series of collinear profiles the limited field of view of this instrument can be increased and profiles that contain longer surface wavelengths can be examined. This dissertation also presents a method to augment both the vertical and horizontal dynamic range of the surface profiler by combining multiple subapertures and two-wavelength techniques. The theory, algorithms, error sources, and limitations encountered when concatenating a number of profiles are presented. In particular, the effects of accumulated piston and tilt errors on a measurement are explored. Some practical considerations for implementation and integration into an existing system are presented. Experimental findings and results of Monte Carlo simulations are also studied to explain the effects of random noise, lateral position errors, and defocus across the CCD array on measurement results. These results indicate the extent to which the field of view of the profiler may be augmented. A review of current methods of measuring surface topography is included, to provide for a more coherent text, along with a summary of pertinent measurement parameters for surface characterization. This work concludes with recommendations for future work that would make subaperture-testing techniques more reliable for measuring the microsurface structure of a material over an extended region.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Flatness measurement.; Interference microscopes.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Optical Sciences; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Wyant, James C.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleExtending the measurement range of an optical surface profiler.en_US
dc.creatorCochran, Eugene Rowland, III.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCochran, Eugene Rowland, III.en_US
dc.date.issued1988en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation investigates a method for extending the measurement range of an optical surface profiling instrument. The instrument examined in these experiments is a computer-controlled phase-modulated interference microscope. Because of its ability to measure surfaces with a high degree of vertical resolution as well as excellent lateral resolution, this instrument is one of the most favorable candidates for determining the microtopography of optical surfaces. However, the data acquired by the instrument are restricted to a finite lateral and vertical range. To overcome this restriction, the feasibility of a new testing technique is explored. By overlapping a series of collinear profiles the limited field of view of this instrument can be increased and profiles that contain longer surface wavelengths can be examined. This dissertation also presents a method to augment both the vertical and horizontal dynamic range of the surface profiler by combining multiple subapertures and two-wavelength techniques. The theory, algorithms, error sources, and limitations encountered when concatenating a number of profiles are presented. In particular, the effects of accumulated piston and tilt errors on a measurement are explored. Some practical considerations for implementation and integration into an existing system are presented. Experimental findings and results of Monte Carlo simulations are also studied to explain the effects of random noise, lateral position errors, and defocus across the CCD array on measurement results. These results indicate the extent to which the field of view of the profiler may be augmented. A review of current methods of measuring surface topography is included, to provide for a more coherent text, along with a summary of pertinent measurement parameters for surface characterization. This work concludes with recommendations for future work that would make subaperture-testing techniques more reliable for measuring the microsurface structure of a material over an extended region.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectFlatness measurement.en_US
dc.subjectInterference microscopes.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineOptical Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorWyant, James C.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest8902397en_US
dc.identifier.oclc701549510en_US
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