Influence strategies used by relational partners during disagreements.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184520
Title:
Influence strategies used by relational partners during disagreements.
Author:
Newton, Deborah Anne.
Issue Date:
1988
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Interpersonal influence refers to the strategies and tactics relational partners use to establish, reinforce, or alter each other's cognitions, emotions, and behaviors. It is argued that in close relationships, influence is used to attain instrumental goals, manage the relationship, and maintain desired identities. Six strategic categories, involving 36 tactics, were created to assess influence during the videotaped disagreements of fifty couples (N = 100). Correlational results suggest that: (1) relational partners are more persuasive when using strategies of other-support and content-validation and less persuasive when using content-invalidation, (2) greater satisfaction is experienced when one's partner uses other-support strategies and does not use accusations, and (3) relational message interpretations of equality, immediacy, informality, and similarity are associated with content-validation and other-support strategies; while interpretations of dominance, lack of immediacy, and lack of equality are associated with content-invalidation and other-accusations. An exploratory effort is made to determine which nonverbal behaviors are most closely associated with verbal strategies and how they predict outcome and global measures.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Interpersonal communication.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Communication; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Burgoon, Judee K.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleInfluence strategies used by relational partners during disagreements.en_US
dc.creatorNewton, Deborah Anne.en_US
dc.contributor.authorNewton, Deborah Anne.en_US
dc.date.issued1988en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractInterpersonal influence refers to the strategies and tactics relational partners use to establish, reinforce, or alter each other's cognitions, emotions, and behaviors. It is argued that in close relationships, influence is used to attain instrumental goals, manage the relationship, and maintain desired identities. Six strategic categories, involving 36 tactics, were created to assess influence during the videotaped disagreements of fifty couples (N = 100). Correlational results suggest that: (1) relational partners are more persuasive when using strategies of other-support and content-validation and less persuasive when using content-invalidation, (2) greater satisfaction is experienced when one's partner uses other-support strategies and does not use accusations, and (3) relational message interpretations of equality, immediacy, informality, and similarity are associated with content-validation and other-support strategies; while interpretations of dominance, lack of immediacy, and lack of equality are associated with content-invalidation and other-accusations. An exploratory effort is made to determine which nonverbal behaviors are most closely associated with verbal strategies and how they predict outcome and global measures.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectInterpersonal communication.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCommunicationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBurgoon, Judee K.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBurgoon, Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBailey, William F.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberTansik, David A.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest8902355en_US
dc.identifier.oclc701508024en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.