Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184509
Title:
An economic analysis of the Saudi Arabian gas utilization system.
Author:
Fetyani, Ahmad Ali.
Issue Date:
1988
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The Saudi Arabian natural gas industry and its downstream activity, particularly petrochemicals, is characterized by its dependence on the country's crude oil production. This is because the main input into these industries is associated natural gas. Most of the Saudi gas-based petrochemical products are sold in international markets where their cost advantage over naphtha-based products is directly proportional to the crude oil price. The profits from Saudi natural gas and its dependent industries are influenced by two countervailing factors. The first is that of the level of crude oil production which determines the utilization level of the gas industry. The second is the international crude oil price on which the returns from petrochemicals, liquified petroleum gases and natural gasoline are directly proportional. This creates a tradeoff situation and necessitates finding a crude oil production level subject to optimizing the country's gas utilization system. A linear programming model is constructed to establish this level and to investigate possible ways to satisfy the country's future gas requirement. The results of the model indicate that the associated gas produced in conjunction with 6.78 million barrels of crude oil per day is needed to operate the gas utilization system at capacity. However, the model estimates that gas associated with a daily crude oil production level of 4.35 million barrels produces the highest returns from the system. Furthermore, to meet the country's gas requirements for 1990 and 2000, based on 4.35 million barrels per day of crude oil, the current daily nonassociated gas capacity should be expanded to 2.27 and 3.15 billion cubic feet, respectively.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Energy industries -- Saudi Arabia.; Saudi Arabia -- Economic policy.; Natural gas -- Saudi Arabia.; Jīzan Region (Saudi Arabia) -- History.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Mining and Geological Engineering; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Rieber, Michael

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleAn economic analysis of the Saudi Arabian gas utilization system.en_US
dc.creatorFetyani, Ahmad Ali.en_US
dc.contributor.authorFetyani, Ahmad Ali.en_US
dc.date.issued1988en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe Saudi Arabian natural gas industry and its downstream activity, particularly petrochemicals, is characterized by its dependence on the country's crude oil production. This is because the main input into these industries is associated natural gas. Most of the Saudi gas-based petrochemical products are sold in international markets where their cost advantage over naphtha-based products is directly proportional to the crude oil price. The profits from Saudi natural gas and its dependent industries are influenced by two countervailing factors. The first is that of the level of crude oil production which determines the utilization level of the gas industry. The second is the international crude oil price on which the returns from petrochemicals, liquified petroleum gases and natural gasoline are directly proportional. This creates a tradeoff situation and necessitates finding a crude oil production level subject to optimizing the country's gas utilization system. A linear programming model is constructed to establish this level and to investigate possible ways to satisfy the country's future gas requirement. The results of the model indicate that the associated gas produced in conjunction with 6.78 million barrels of crude oil per day is needed to operate the gas utilization system at capacity. However, the model estimates that gas associated with a daily crude oil production level of 4.35 million barrels produces the highest returns from the system. Furthermore, to meet the country's gas requirements for 1990 and 2000, based on 4.35 million barrels per day of crude oil, the current daily nonassociated gas capacity should be expanded to 2.27 and 3.15 billion cubic feet, respectively.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEnergy industries -- Saudi Arabia.en_US
dc.subjectSaudi Arabia -- Economic policy.en_US
dc.subjectNatural gas -- Saudi Arabia.en_US
dc.subjectJīzan Region (Saudi Arabia) -- History.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMining and Geological Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorRieber, Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHarris, DeVerle P.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberNewcomb, Richard T.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest8902342en_US
dc.identifier.oclc701383465en_US
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