POWER-CONFLICT, CULTURAL PREPARATION AND OCCUPATIONAL PRESTIGE: A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF ARIZONA FARM WAGE-WORKERS FROM FOUR ETHNIC CATEGORIES.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184503
Title:
POWER-CONFLICT, CULTURAL PREPARATION AND OCCUPATIONAL PRESTIGE: A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF ARIZONA FARM WAGE-WORKERS FROM FOUR ETHNIC CATEGORIES.
Author:
HANNON, JOHN JAMES.
Issue Date:
1982
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
In 1972, town-based farmworkers in the agricultural region of Pinal County, Arizona were surveyed. Random samples of Anglo, Black, Mexican American, and Native American male family heads provided data to study the correlates of their occupational prestige. The work of Harland Padfield and William Martin offered a measure of prestige, along with a functional set of predictors, while conflict-competition theory furnished an alternate set and its corresponding hypotheses. Ethnicity was studied for interaction with the 21 independent variables, and the ranking of the ethnic groups relative to one another was scrutinized. Since analysis of covariance revealed significant interaction by four of the predictors (with the slope for Blacks contrasting most markedly with the Anglo reference category), further analysis, by multiple regression, was made within the ethnic divisions. In the case of Anglos, the significant correlates of prestige were optimism about workers' being able to improve their job situation, and a desire for training, although age, in the negative, controlled the latter. With Blacks, an equation which included age, time spent in the county, residence in Eloy, and membership in associations explained 53% of the variation in prestige. The Mexican American study yielded only a working family pattern as a correlate. Native Americans showed the influence of education on their job prestige (when age was not controlled), and of residential mobility, lack of house ownership, and unwillingness to move. A study of cases from each ethnic group, with insight from experience, suggested several conclusions beyond the data themselves. Caution in measuring attitudes of Native Americans was indicated. There also emerged implications for future policy and research.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Agricultural laborers -- Arizona -- Psychology.; Ethnic attitudes.; Ethnicity.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Sociology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Cleland, Courtney B.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titlePOWER-CONFLICT, CULTURAL PREPARATION AND OCCUPATIONAL PRESTIGE: A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF ARIZONA FARM WAGE-WORKERS FROM FOUR ETHNIC CATEGORIES.en_US
dc.creatorHANNON, JOHN JAMES.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHANNON, JOHN JAMES.en_US
dc.date.issued1982en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn 1972, town-based farmworkers in the agricultural region of Pinal County, Arizona were surveyed. Random samples of Anglo, Black, Mexican American, and Native American male family heads provided data to study the correlates of their occupational prestige. The work of Harland Padfield and William Martin offered a measure of prestige, along with a functional set of predictors, while conflict-competition theory furnished an alternate set and its corresponding hypotheses. Ethnicity was studied for interaction with the 21 independent variables, and the ranking of the ethnic groups relative to one another was scrutinized. Since analysis of covariance revealed significant interaction by four of the predictors (with the slope for Blacks contrasting most markedly with the Anglo reference category), further analysis, by multiple regression, was made within the ethnic divisions. In the case of Anglos, the significant correlates of prestige were optimism about workers' being able to improve their job situation, and a desire for training, although age, in the negative, controlled the latter. With Blacks, an equation which included age, time spent in the county, residence in Eloy, and membership in associations explained 53% of the variation in prestige. The Mexican American study yielded only a working family pattern as a correlate. Native Americans showed the influence of education on their job prestige (when age was not controlled), and of residential mobility, lack of house ownership, and unwillingness to move. A study of cases from each ethnic group, with insight from experience, suggested several conclusions beyond the data themselves. Caution in measuring attitudes of Native Americans was indicated. There also emerged implications for future policy and research.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAgricultural laborers -- Arizona -- Psychology.en_US
dc.subjectEthnic attitudes.en_US
dc.subjectEthnicity.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSociologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorCleland, Courtney B.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest8227354en_US
dc.identifier.oclc682920297en_US
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