Optical computing using interference filters as nonlinear optical logic gates and holographic optical elements as optical interconnects.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184502
Title:
Optical computing using interference filters as nonlinear optical logic gates and holographic optical elements as optical interconnects.
Author:
Wang, Lon A.
Issue Date:
1988
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation experimentally explores digital optical computing and optical interconnects with theoretical supports, from the physics of materials and the optimization of devices to system realization. The trend of optical computing is highlighted with the emphasis on the current development of its basic constituent elements, and a couple of algorithms selected to pave the way for utilizing bistable devices for their optical implementations. Optical bistable devices function as "optical transistors" in optical computing. The physics of dispersive optical bistability is briefly described. Bistable ZnS interference filters are discussed in detail regarding their linear and nonlienar characteristics. The optimization of switching characteristics for a bistable ZnS interference filter is discussed, and experimental results are shown. Symbolic substitution which fully takes advantage of regular optical interconnects constitutes two steps: pattern recognition and symbol scription. Two experiments on two digital pattern recognitions and one on a simple but complete symbolic substitution have been demonstrated. The extension of these experiments is an implementation of a binary adder. A one-bit full adder which is a basic block for a computer has been explored experimentally and demonstrated in an all-optical way. The utilization of a bistable device as a nonlinear decision-making element is further demonstrated in an associative memory experiment by incorporating a Vander Lugt matched filter to discriminate two partial fingerprints. The thresholding function of a bistable device enhances the S/N ratio and helps discrimination in associative memory. As the clocking speed of a computer goes higher, e.g. greater than several GHz, the clock signal distribution and packaging become serious problems in VLSI technology. The use of optical interconnects introduces a possible solution. A unique element for holographic optical interconnects, which combines advantages of computer generated hologram and DCG recording material, is discussed. Pattern design of a specific computer generated hologram and a proposed fabrication process are described. Experimental results suggest that this unique element has the capability of being tailored to perform multiple fan-out with resulting uniform tightly-focussed spots, and coupling between devices, e.g. source-to-fiber and fiber-to-waveguides, etc.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Renal pharmacology.; Organic compounds -- Toxicology.; Kidneys -- Wounds and injuries.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Optical Sciences; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Gibbs, H.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleOptical computing using interference filters as nonlinear optical logic gates and holographic optical elements as optical interconnects.en_US
dc.creatorWang, Lon A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorWang, Lon A.en_US
dc.date.issued1988en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation experimentally explores digital optical computing and optical interconnects with theoretical supports, from the physics of materials and the optimization of devices to system realization. The trend of optical computing is highlighted with the emphasis on the current development of its basic constituent elements, and a couple of algorithms selected to pave the way for utilizing bistable devices for their optical implementations. Optical bistable devices function as "optical transistors" in optical computing. The physics of dispersive optical bistability is briefly described. Bistable ZnS interference filters are discussed in detail regarding their linear and nonlienar characteristics. The optimization of switching characteristics for a bistable ZnS interference filter is discussed, and experimental results are shown. Symbolic substitution which fully takes advantage of regular optical interconnects constitutes two steps: pattern recognition and symbol scription. Two experiments on two digital pattern recognitions and one on a simple but complete symbolic substitution have been demonstrated. The extension of these experiments is an implementation of a binary adder. A one-bit full adder which is a basic block for a computer has been explored experimentally and demonstrated in an all-optical way. The utilization of a bistable device as a nonlinear decision-making element is further demonstrated in an associative memory experiment by incorporating a Vander Lugt matched filter to discriminate two partial fingerprints. The thresholding function of a bistable device enhances the S/N ratio and helps discrimination in associative memory. As the clocking speed of a computer goes higher, e.g. greater than several GHz, the clock signal distribution and packaging become serious problems in VLSI technology. The use of optical interconnects introduces a possible solution. A unique element for holographic optical interconnects, which combines advantages of computer generated hologram and DCG recording material, is discussed. Pattern design of a specific computer generated hologram and a proposed fabrication process are described. Experimental results suggest that this unique element has the capability of being tailored to perform multiple fan-out with resulting uniform tightly-focussed spots, and coupling between devices, e.g. source-to-fiber and fiber-to-waveguides, etc.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectRenal pharmacology.en_US
dc.subjectOrganic compounds -- Toxicology.en_US
dc.subjectKidneys -- Wounds and injuries.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineOptical Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorGibbs, H.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKostuk, R.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPeyghambarian N.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest8824294en_US
dc.identifier.oclc701368767en_US
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