Agrarian ecology and settlement patterns: An ethnoarchaeological case study.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184498
Title:
Agrarian ecology and settlement patterns: An ethnoarchaeological case study.
Author:
Stone, Glenn Davis.
Issue Date:
1988
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Although settlement patterns are a central topic of archaeological research, there is a paucity of general theory on the determinants of agrarian settlement. What passes for a theory of agrarian settlement in archaeology is a borrowed model which does not recognize the relationship between population density and agricultural intensity. This dissertation argues that the rules determining where farmers settle are inextricable from how they farm. Ethnohistoric and ethnoarchaeological data are used to investigate the relationship between agricultural change and the determinants of settlement location in the case of the Kofyar, a population of farmers colonizing a frontier area in the central Nigerian savanna. As they moved into an area with a low ratio of population to productive land, Kofyar agriculture was extensified in accord with the Boserup (1965) model. With potentially greater travel costs associated with domestic water than with farm plots, streams exerted a strong attraction to early settlements. With increasing land pressure, the attraction value of farmland eclipsed the attraction to water. Contrary to Boserup's theory that agricultural responses to land pressure cross-cut environments, analysis of settlement histories of over 1000 households shows that responses vary with soil type. Farmers on high-quality sandstone-derived soils tend to intensify cultivation, while farmers on inferior shale-derived and igneous-derived soils tend to abandon their farms when yields begin to decline. The location of Kofyar compounds with respect to each other is closely related to the labor demands of agricultural production. The restricted range of distances between residential compounds reflects the reliance on inter-household collaboration in agricultural production.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Land settlement patterns -- Nigeria.; Agricultural ecology -- Nigeria.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Anthropology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleAgrarian ecology and settlement patterns: An ethnoarchaeological case study.en_US
dc.creatorStone, Glenn Davis.en_US
dc.contributor.authorStone, Glenn Davis.en_US
dc.date.issued1988en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractAlthough settlement patterns are a central topic of archaeological research, there is a paucity of general theory on the determinants of agrarian settlement. What passes for a theory of agrarian settlement in archaeology is a borrowed model which does not recognize the relationship between population density and agricultural intensity. This dissertation argues that the rules determining where farmers settle are inextricable from how they farm. Ethnohistoric and ethnoarchaeological data are used to investigate the relationship between agricultural change and the determinants of settlement location in the case of the Kofyar, a population of farmers colonizing a frontier area in the central Nigerian savanna. As they moved into an area with a low ratio of population to productive land, Kofyar agriculture was extensified in accord with the Boserup (1965) model. With potentially greater travel costs associated with domestic water than with farm plots, streams exerted a strong attraction to early settlements. With increasing land pressure, the attraction value of farmland eclipsed the attraction to water. Contrary to Boserup's theory that agricultural responses to land pressure cross-cut environments, analysis of settlement histories of over 1000 households shows that responses vary with soil type. Farmers on high-quality sandstone-derived soils tend to intensify cultivation, while farmers on inferior shale-derived and igneous-derived soils tend to abandon their farms when yields begin to decline. The location of Kofyar compounds with respect to each other is closely related to the labor demands of agricultural production. The restricted range of distances between residential compounds reflects the reliance on inter-household collaboration in agricultural production.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectLand settlement patterns -- Nigeria.en_US
dc.subjectAgricultural ecology -- Nigeria.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8824290en_US
dc.identifier.oclc701333212en_US
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