The biogeography and ecology of foxtail pine, Pinus balfouriana (Grev. and Balf.), in the Sierra Nevada of California.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184495
Title:
The biogeography and ecology of foxtail pine, Pinus balfouriana (Grev. and Balf.), in the Sierra Nevada of California.
Author:
Rourke, Michael David.
Issue Date:
1988
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The biogeography and ecology of P. balfouriana, a subalpine conifer endemic to California, were studied. Direct gradient-analysis, classification, and ordination were combined to identify the primary factors controlling the tree community in the southern Sierra Nevada. Competition, disturbance, and temperature were inferred as the most important factors regulating the tree community. Pinus balfouriana responded strongly to variation in soil drainage, distrubance, and temperature. Wildfire was the most important chronic disturbance agent in southwestern Inyo National Forest. Stochastic models of wildfire probability in space and time were developed. Evidence of thunderstorm genesis zones in the vicinity of Overlook Mountain and Ball Mountain in the Golden Trout Wilderness was found. A gradient in wildfire ignition probability was identified. Wildfire ignition is most likely at 2700 m elevation on submesic sites. Wildfire return interval is long enough to permit the coexistence of P. balfouriana and P. murrayana; and, short enough that it has important fitness consequences for P. balfouriana. Wildfire disturbance may limit the geographic range of the species in the southern Sierra Nevada. There was a close negative correlation between the abundance of P. balfouriana near the lower-forest-border and the wildfire disturbance gradient. However, the northern range boundary is probably not determined solely by wildfire disturbance. The canopies of mature P. balfouriana were found to be highly elliptic (when viewed from above) with the major axis of the ellipse oriented exactly north-to-south. This trait permits maximum photosynthesis in the early morning and late afternoon. It simultaneously minimizes evaporative demands during midday. Elliptic canopies minimize solar interception during winter and maximize it during summer. This is important for carbon-balance since the photosynthetic apparatus is only active for a brief period during mid-summer. The lower-forest-border was accurately predicted with a carbon-balance model strongly suggesting carbon-balance limitations. The dispersal potential of P. balfouriana, in the absence of vertebrate seed dispersers, was studied. Anemochory under modern climatic conditions would permit closure of the disjunction in P. balfouriana within a single (120,000 year) glacial cycle.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Foxtail pine.; Pine -- Sierra Nevada (Calif. and Nev.)
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Ecology and Evolutionary Biology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Robichaux, Robert H.; Brown, James H.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe biogeography and ecology of foxtail pine, Pinus balfouriana (Grev. and Balf.), in the Sierra Nevada of California.en_US
dc.creatorRourke, Michael David.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRourke, Michael David.en_US
dc.date.issued1988en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe biogeography and ecology of P. balfouriana, a subalpine conifer endemic to California, were studied. Direct gradient-analysis, classification, and ordination were combined to identify the primary factors controlling the tree community in the southern Sierra Nevada. Competition, disturbance, and temperature were inferred as the most important factors regulating the tree community. Pinus balfouriana responded strongly to variation in soil drainage, distrubance, and temperature. Wildfire was the most important chronic disturbance agent in southwestern Inyo National Forest. Stochastic models of wildfire probability in space and time were developed. Evidence of thunderstorm genesis zones in the vicinity of Overlook Mountain and Ball Mountain in the Golden Trout Wilderness was found. A gradient in wildfire ignition probability was identified. Wildfire ignition is most likely at 2700 m elevation on submesic sites. Wildfire return interval is long enough to permit the coexistence of P. balfouriana and P. murrayana; and, short enough that it has important fitness consequences for P. balfouriana. Wildfire disturbance may limit the geographic range of the species in the southern Sierra Nevada. There was a close negative correlation between the abundance of P. balfouriana near the lower-forest-border and the wildfire disturbance gradient. However, the northern range boundary is probably not determined solely by wildfire disturbance. The canopies of mature P. balfouriana were found to be highly elliptic (when viewed from above) with the major axis of the ellipse oriented exactly north-to-south. This trait permits maximum photosynthesis in the early morning and late afternoon. It simultaneously minimizes evaporative demands during midday. Elliptic canopies minimize solar interception during winter and maximize it during summer. This is important for carbon-balance since the photosynthetic apparatus is only active for a brief period during mid-summer. The lower-forest-border was accurately predicted with a carbon-balance model strongly suggesting carbon-balance limitations. The dispersal potential of P. balfouriana, in the absence of vertebrate seed dispersers, was studied. Anemochory under modern climatic conditions would permit closure of the disjunction in P. balfouriana within a single (120,000 year) glacial cycle.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectFoxtail pine.en_US
dc.subjectPine -- Sierra Nevada (Calif. and Nev.)en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEcology and Evolutionary Biologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorRobichaux, Robert H.en_US
dc.contributor.advisorBrown, James H.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberTelewski, Frank W.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDonoghue, Michael J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDavis, Owen K.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest8824287en_US
dc.identifier.oclc701366773en_US
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