A genetic and biochemical analysis of LexA repressor cleavage in Escherichia coli K-12.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184488
Title:
A genetic and biochemical analysis of LexA repressor cleavage in Escherichia coli K-12.
Author:
Lin, Lih-Ling.
Issue Date:
1988
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The LexA repressor of Escherichia coli represses a set of genes that are expressed in response to DNA damage. After inducing treatments, the repressor is inactivated in vivo by a specific cleavage reaction which requires RecA protein. Under physiological conditions in vitro, RecA-dependent cleavage also occurs. At alkaline pH, however, the specific cleavage reaction occurs spontaneously without RecA, a reaction which is termed autodigestion. The LexA repressor is, therefore, thought to cleave itself with RecA acting to stimulate autodigestion. A set of lexA (Ind⁻) mutants that are deficient in in vivo RecA-mediated cleavage but retain significant repressor function were isolated. These 20 mutations resulted in amino acid substitutions in 12 positions, most of which are conserved between LexA and four other cleavable proteins. All the mutations were located in the hinge region or C-terminal domain of the protein, portions of LexA previously implicated in the specific cleavage reactions. Furthermore, these mutations were clustered in three regions, around the cleavage site (Ala-84-Gly-85) and in blocks of conserved amino acids around two residues, Ser-119 and Lys-156, which are believed essential for the cleavage reactions. These three regions of the protein thus appear to play important roles in the cleavage reaction. Many of the mutant proteins were purified in order to further characterize their properties in both autodigestion and RecA-mediated cleavage. All of these mutant proteins are found to be deficient in both cleavage reactions. A mutant protein, replacing Lys-156 to Arg, requires a higher pH condition than the wild-type protein does for both cleavage reactions. The results suggest that deprotonation of Arg-156, and by inference Lys-156 in the wild-type protein, is required for both autodigestion and RecA-mediated cleavage; and that in the latter reaction RecA acts to reduce the pKa of Lys-156, allowing efficient cleavage of wild-type repressor under physiological conditions. Finally, several mutant proteins affecting amino acids around the cleavage site and the proposed nucleophile in the cleavage reaction (Ser-119) could not efficiently act as a competitive inhibitor in the RecA-mediated cleavage of wild-type repressor, presumably because they affect RecA binding.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
DNA damage.; Escherichia coli.; Biochemical genetics.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Biochemistry; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Little, John W.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleA genetic and biochemical analysis of LexA repressor cleavage in Escherichia coli K-12.en_US
dc.creatorLin, Lih-Ling.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLin, Lih-Ling.en_US
dc.date.issued1988en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe LexA repressor of Escherichia coli represses a set of genes that are expressed in response to DNA damage. After inducing treatments, the repressor is inactivated in vivo by a specific cleavage reaction which requires RecA protein. Under physiological conditions in vitro, RecA-dependent cleavage also occurs. At alkaline pH, however, the specific cleavage reaction occurs spontaneously without RecA, a reaction which is termed autodigestion. The LexA repressor is, therefore, thought to cleave itself with RecA acting to stimulate autodigestion. A set of lexA (Ind⁻) mutants that are deficient in in vivo RecA-mediated cleavage but retain significant repressor function were isolated. These 20 mutations resulted in amino acid substitutions in 12 positions, most of which are conserved between LexA and four other cleavable proteins. All the mutations were located in the hinge region or C-terminal domain of the protein, portions of LexA previously implicated in the specific cleavage reactions. Furthermore, these mutations were clustered in three regions, around the cleavage site (Ala-84-Gly-85) and in blocks of conserved amino acids around two residues, Ser-119 and Lys-156, which are believed essential for the cleavage reactions. These three regions of the protein thus appear to play important roles in the cleavage reaction. Many of the mutant proteins were purified in order to further characterize their properties in both autodigestion and RecA-mediated cleavage. All of these mutant proteins are found to be deficient in both cleavage reactions. A mutant protein, replacing Lys-156 to Arg, requires a higher pH condition than the wild-type protein does for both cleavage reactions. The results suggest that deprotonation of Arg-156, and by inference Lys-156 in the wild-type protein, is required for both autodigestion and RecA-mediated cleavage; and that in the latter reaction RecA acts to reduce the pKa of Lys-156, allowing efficient cleavage of wild-type repressor under physiological conditions. Finally, several mutant proteins affecting amino acids around the cleavage site and the proposed nucleophile in the cleavage reaction (Ser-119) could not efficiently act as a competitive inhibitor in the RecA-mediated cleavage of wild-type repressor, presumably because they affect RecA binding.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectDNA damage.en_US
dc.subjectEscherichia coli.en_US
dc.subjectBiochemical genetics.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineBiochemistryen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorLittle, John W.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWells, Michael A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGrimes, William J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMount, David W.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHewlett, Martinez J.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest8824281en_US
dc.identifier.oclc701366679en_US
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