An experimental investigation of automated versus manual support for stakeholder identification and assumption surfacing in small groups.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184450
Title:
An experimental investigation of automated versus manual support for stakeholder identification and assumption surfacing in small groups.
Author:
Easton, Annette Cecilia.
Issue Date:
1988
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The increasing complexity of decision situations has required organizations to integrate more types of expertise and consider more criteria for effective group decision making. Researchers have begun to examine how computer based support in the form of a Group Decision Support System (GDSS) can enhance the process and outcomes of decision making groups. This dissertation investigated the impact of GDSS for strategic planning impact analysis. The GDSS was based on the Stakeholder Identification and Assumption Surfacing Model. A controlled laboratory experiment was used to compare the process and outcomes of 4-person groups which had GDSS support, comparable manual support, and no support. The experimental task was a policy statement requiring undergraduates to have a personal computer for admittance to a business college. Groups were asked to determine a list of the most critical stakeholders who would be impacted by the policy, and their assumptions regarding the policy statement. Measures were taken on decision outcomes (decision quality, decision time, and satisfaction with the outcomes) and decision process variables (quantity of unique alternatives, distribution of individual participation, and satisfaction with the process). Additionally, observational data was recorded through the use of videotape recordings of the sessions. The major findings of the study are: (1) Decision quality is enhanced when groups use a structured methodology; (2) Decision time was shortest in the unstructured groups, with GDSS groups finishing somewhat faster than manual structured groups; (3) Satisfaction with the outcomes was not different between structured and unstructured groups, however it was higher in the GDSS groups compared to the structured manual groups; (4) Quantity of unique alternatives was much higher in the groups using a structured methodology; (5) Distribution of individual participation was more equal in groups using a structured methodology; and (6) Satisfaction with the process was not different between structured and unstructured groups, however the GDSS groups were more satisfied than the structured manual groups.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Interactive computer systems.; Group decision making.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Business Administration; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Nunamaker, Jay; Vogel, Doug

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleAn experimental investigation of automated versus manual support for stakeholder identification and assumption surfacing in small groups.en_US
dc.creatorEaston, Annette Cecilia.en_US
dc.contributor.authorEaston, Annette Cecilia.en_US
dc.date.issued1988en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe increasing complexity of decision situations has required organizations to integrate more types of expertise and consider more criteria for effective group decision making. Researchers have begun to examine how computer based support in the form of a Group Decision Support System (GDSS) can enhance the process and outcomes of decision making groups. This dissertation investigated the impact of GDSS for strategic planning impact analysis. The GDSS was based on the Stakeholder Identification and Assumption Surfacing Model. A controlled laboratory experiment was used to compare the process and outcomes of 4-person groups which had GDSS support, comparable manual support, and no support. The experimental task was a policy statement requiring undergraduates to have a personal computer for admittance to a business college. Groups were asked to determine a list of the most critical stakeholders who would be impacted by the policy, and their assumptions regarding the policy statement. Measures were taken on decision outcomes (decision quality, decision time, and satisfaction with the outcomes) and decision process variables (quantity of unique alternatives, distribution of individual participation, and satisfaction with the process). Additionally, observational data was recorded through the use of videotape recordings of the sessions. The major findings of the study are: (1) Decision quality is enhanced when groups use a structured methodology; (2) Decision time was shortest in the unstructured groups, with GDSS groups finishing somewhat faster than manual structured groups; (3) Satisfaction with the outcomes was not different between structured and unstructured groups, however it was higher in the GDSS groups compared to the structured manual groups; (4) Quantity of unique alternatives was much higher in the groups using a structured methodology; (5) Distribution of individual participation was more equal in groups using a structured methodology; and (6) Satisfaction with the process was not different between structured and unstructured groups, however the GDSS groups were more satisfied than the structured manual groups.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectInteractive computer systems.en_US
dc.subjectGroup decision making.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineBusiness Administrationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairNunamaker, Jayen_US
dc.contributor.chairVogel, Dougen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8822421en_US
dc.identifier.oclc701369925en_US
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