Psychosocial factors and changes in peripheral vision, muscle tension, and fine motor skills during stress.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184446
Title:
Psychosocial factors and changes in peripheral vision, muscle tension, and fine motor skills during stress.
Author:
Andersen, Mark Bille.
Issue Date:
1988
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
A theoretical model of stress and athletic injury is presented. The purpose of the dissertation is to propose a comprehensive framework of the stress-injury relationship that includes cognitive, physiological, attentional, behavioral, intrapersonal, social, and stress history variables. Development of the model grew from a synthesis of the stress-illness, stress-accident, and stress-injury literatures. The model and its resulting hypotheses offer a framework for many avenues of research into the nature of injury and reduction of injury risk. Other advantages of the model are that it addresses possible mechanisms behind the stress-injury relationship and it suggests several specific interventions that may help diminish the likelihood of injury. The model also has the potential to be applied to the investigation of injury and accident occurrence in general. A portion of the model is then tested experimentally. Personality, stress, and coping resource variables are used to predict changes in peripheral vision, general muscle tension, heart rate, state anxiety, and fine motor skill (a hand steadiness task) from baseline to stress condition (a dual-task paradigm with noise as an added stressor). There were significant decreases in peripheral vision and hand steadiness accompanied by significant increases in state anxiety and heart rate from baseline to stress conditions. The only significant predictor variable for peripheral vision changes was negative life events. Subjects with high negative life events ratings had greater peripheral vision deficits during stress than subjects who rated low on negative life events. For increases in state anxiety only the self report of how the subject experienced the stress condition was significant. Subjects who rated the stress condition as stressful had greater state anxiety increases than subjects who rated the stress condition as challenging. The results are discussed in terms of future directions for stress-injury research.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Psychology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Sechrest, Lee

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titlePsychosocial factors and changes in peripheral vision, muscle tension, and fine motor skills during stress.en_US
dc.creatorAndersen, Mark Bille.en_US
dc.contributor.authorAndersen, Mark Bille.en_US
dc.date.issued1988en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractA theoretical model of stress and athletic injury is presented. The purpose of the dissertation is to propose a comprehensive framework of the stress-injury relationship that includes cognitive, physiological, attentional, behavioral, intrapersonal, social, and stress history variables. Development of the model grew from a synthesis of the stress-illness, stress-accident, and stress-injury literatures. The model and its resulting hypotheses offer a framework for many avenues of research into the nature of injury and reduction of injury risk. Other advantages of the model are that it addresses possible mechanisms behind the stress-injury relationship and it suggests several specific interventions that may help diminish the likelihood of injury. The model also has the potential to be applied to the investigation of injury and accident occurrence in general. A portion of the model is then tested experimentally. Personality, stress, and coping resource variables are used to predict changes in peripheral vision, general muscle tension, heart rate, state anxiety, and fine motor skill (a hand steadiness task) from baseline to stress condition (a dual-task paradigm with noise as an added stressor). There were significant decreases in peripheral vision and hand steadiness accompanied by significant increases in state anxiety and heart rate from baseline to stress conditions. The only significant predictor variable for peripheral vision changes was negative life events. Subjects with high negative life events ratings had greater peripheral vision deficits during stress than subjects who rated low on negative life events. For increases in state anxiety only the self report of how the subject experienced the stress condition was significant. Subjects who rated the stress condition as stressful had greater state anxiety increases than subjects who rated the stress condition as challenging. The results are discussed in terms of future directions for stress-injury research.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSechrest, Leeen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberIttelson, William H.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLansing, Robert W.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWilliams, Jean M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMiller, Donna Maeen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8822418en_US
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