Motion perception: The effects of perceived three-dimensional distance.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184431
Title:
Motion perception: The effects of perceived three-dimensional distance.
Author:
Mowafy, Marilyn Kay.
Issue Date:
1988
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Contemporary computational models of motion perception assume that in processing continuous or near-continuous motion information, the visual system measures spatial displacement in retinal coordinates over a series of time-varying images. Additional three-dimensional information possessed by the system purportedly does not influence this low-level motion analysis. The present research investigated the influence of static three-dimensional distance information recovered from binocular disparity on the perceived direction of motion. It was assumed that if a stereoscopic display context influenced perceived motion direction, the apparent velocity of a moving element would increase in order to traverse the greater apparent distance. This would be reflected in a predictable pattern of errors when the true angular velocity was the same, slower or faster than that of the standard. The stimuli consisted of random-dot stereograms depicting surfaces at varying distances and orientations. In one stereoscopic display, the disparity information indicated a surface sloping smoothly in depth from crossed to uncrossed disparity. The second display contained two fronto-parallel planes at discrete distances from the observed. Motion stimuli were single element translating horizontally and presented monocularly to the observer's right eye. Experiment 1 compared differential velocity judgments in the contexts of the sloped surface and a control condition at zero disparity. The results indicated an overall increase in the perceived velocity of the element moving in the context of the sloped surface. The pattern of results was replicated in experiment 2, but an additional effect of the relative positions of the two surfaces also was obtained. Experiment 3 explored the case of two discrete fronto-parallel planes, one at crossed disparity and the other at uncrossed disparity. This experiment also produced a position effect, but indicated that the perceived distance of the two planes did not differentially affect observer's velocity judgments. It was concluded that in some cases, the metric of motion analysis could be affected by three-dimensional information recovered from binocular disparity. The particular case discovered in these experiments was a surface that appeared to slope smoothly in depth. Discrete depth planes produced no such effect.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Motion perception (Vision); Movement, Psychology of.; Depth perception.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Psychology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Cooper, Lynn A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleMotion perception: The effects of perceived three-dimensional distance.en_US
dc.creatorMowafy, Marilyn Kay.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMowafy, Marilyn Kay.en_US
dc.date.issued1988en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractContemporary computational models of motion perception assume that in processing continuous or near-continuous motion information, the visual system measures spatial displacement in retinal coordinates over a series of time-varying images. Additional three-dimensional information possessed by the system purportedly does not influence this low-level motion analysis. The present research investigated the influence of static three-dimensional distance information recovered from binocular disparity on the perceived direction of motion. It was assumed that if a stereoscopic display context influenced perceived motion direction, the apparent velocity of a moving element would increase in order to traverse the greater apparent distance. This would be reflected in a predictable pattern of errors when the true angular velocity was the same, slower or faster than that of the standard. The stimuli consisted of random-dot stereograms depicting surfaces at varying distances and orientations. In one stereoscopic display, the disparity information indicated a surface sloping smoothly in depth from crossed to uncrossed disparity. The second display contained two fronto-parallel planes at discrete distances from the observed. Motion stimuli were single element translating horizontally and presented monocularly to the observer's right eye. Experiment 1 compared differential velocity judgments in the contexts of the sloped surface and a control condition at zero disparity. The results indicated an overall increase in the perceived velocity of the element moving in the context of the sloped surface. The pattern of results was replicated in experiment 2, but an additional effect of the relative positions of the two surfaces also was obtained. Experiment 3 explored the case of two discrete fronto-parallel planes, one at crossed disparity and the other at uncrossed disparity. This experiment also produced a position effect, but indicated that the perceived distance of the two planes did not differentially affect observer's velocity judgments. It was concluded that in some cases, the metric of motion analysis could be affected by three-dimensional information recovered from binocular disparity. The particular case discovered in these experiments was a surface that appeared to slope smoothly in depth. Discrete depth planes produced no such effect.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectMotion perception (Vision)en_US
dc.subjectMovement, Psychology of.en_US
dc.subjectDepth perception.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorCooper, Lynn A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberIttelson, William H.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBartlett, Neil R.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberNadel, Lynnen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHarnish, Robert M.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest8816316en_US
dc.identifier.oclc701248662en_US
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