Alternative perspectives for analyzing expert, novice, and postulant teaching.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184423
Title:
Alternative perspectives for analyzing expert, novice, and postulant teaching.
Author:
Clarridge, Pamela Brown.
Issue Date:
1988
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The investigation of expertise in teaching has followed the lead of research in domains other than education in that it has focused on the cognitive processes that define expertise. This study has shifted the focus to the actual classroom teaching, comparing expert, novice, and postulant (those without pedagogical training) teachers. Each of six teachers (two experts, two novices, and two postulants) taught the same unfamiliar lesson to the same group of students, in the same classroom. These half hour lessons were videotaped. Two aspects make this study unique. First, the teaching situation was controlled to the extent that each teacher taught the same lesson to the same students. This was done to try to separate expertise from the experience gained from teaching a familiar lesson to students known to the teacher. The second aspect pertains to the method of analysis. Instead of viewing these tapes from just one perspective, four perspectives were used. Observers knowledgeable in the areas of subject matter knowledge and delivery, connoisseurship and criticism, nonverbal communication, and teacher evaluation instrumentation viewed each of the six tapes and analyzed what they saw from their individual perspectives. These analyses were then content analyzed by the author. Results and discussion were first analyzed for each perspective separately, comparing the three groups of teachers for similarities and differences. This was followed by a discussion of similarities and differences among the four perspectives, particularly focusing on the interplay of the four perspectives within the three groups of teachers. A key point made was the diversity of information provided by each perspective and the unique insights provided from the use of all four.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Teachers -- Training of -- United States.; Teachers -- Rating of -- United States.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Educational Foundations and Administration; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleAlternative perspectives for analyzing expert, novice, and postulant teaching.en_US
dc.creatorClarridge, Pamela Brown.en_US
dc.contributor.authorClarridge, Pamela Brown.en_US
dc.date.issued1988en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe investigation of expertise in teaching has followed the lead of research in domains other than education in that it has focused on the cognitive processes that define expertise. This study has shifted the focus to the actual classroom teaching, comparing expert, novice, and postulant (those without pedagogical training) teachers. Each of six teachers (two experts, two novices, and two postulants) taught the same unfamiliar lesson to the same group of students, in the same classroom. These half hour lessons were videotaped. Two aspects make this study unique. First, the teaching situation was controlled to the extent that each teacher taught the same lesson to the same students. This was done to try to separate expertise from the experience gained from teaching a familiar lesson to students known to the teacher. The second aspect pertains to the method of analysis. Instead of viewing these tapes from just one perspective, four perspectives were used. Observers knowledgeable in the areas of subject matter knowledge and delivery, connoisseurship and criticism, nonverbal communication, and teacher evaluation instrumentation viewed each of the six tapes and analyzed what they saw from their individual perspectives. These analyses were then content analyzed by the author. Results and discussion were first analyzed for each perspective separately, comparing the three groups of teachers for similarities and differences. This was followed by a discussion of similarities and differences among the four perspectives, particularly focusing on the interplay of the four perspectives within the three groups of teachers. A key point made was the diversity of information provided by each perspective and the unique insights provided from the use of all four.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectTeachers -- Training of -- United States.en_US
dc.subjectTeachers -- Rating of -- United States.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Foundations and Administrationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8816309en_US
dc.identifier.oclc701247356en_US
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