The effects of intraluteal infusion of prostaglandin-synthesis inhibitors on the function of the primate corpus luteum.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184406
Title:
The effects of intraluteal infusion of prostaglandin-synthesis inhibitors on the function of the primate corpus luteum.
Author:
Sargent, Eva Lee.
Issue Date:
1988
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Exogenous prostaglandins (PGs) have been reported to suppress or to promote the function of the primate corpus luteum in vitro and in vivo, but the role of endogenous ovarian prostaglandins in regulating luteal function during the menstrual cycle is unknown. Infusion (via osmotic pump) of the prostaglandin-synthesis inhibitor sodium meclofenamate into the corpus luteum, but not via the jugular vein, during the midluteal phase of the menstrual cycle resulted in a decline in progesterone levels and premature menses in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta). These results suggest that meclofenamate suppresses the production of an obligatory luteotropic prostaglandin or other metabolite of arachidonic acid. We were unable to confirm that ovarian prostaglandin synthesis was diminished during treatment, since we could not consistently measure a gradient in PGE or PGF₂(α) across the ovary. Dispersed cells from the macaque corpus luteum produced PGF₂(α) in vitro. Production was stimulated by exposure to arachidonic acid and was inhibited by meclofenamate and another prostaglandin-synthesis inhibitor, flurbiprofen. Although the two drugs were potent inhibitors of prostaglandin synthesis in vitro, intraluteal infusion of flurbiprofen in monkeys did not mimic the luteolytic effects of meclofenamate. These studies provide the first evidence of an obligatory luteotropic role for a metabolite of arachidonic acid during the primate luteal phase. However the data suggest that the luteolytic effect of meclofenamate in vivo is not mediated entirely by the inhibition of local prostaglandin synthesis. Further studies are needed to determine the mechanism(s) of meclofenamate-induced luteolysis and to identify the putative obligatory luteotropin.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Prostaglandins -- Synthesis.; Corpus luteum.; Luteal phase defects.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Physiology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Stouffer, Richard

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe effects of intraluteal infusion of prostaglandin-synthesis inhibitors on the function of the primate corpus luteum.en_US
dc.creatorSargent, Eva Lee.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSargent, Eva Lee.en_US
dc.date.issued1988en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractExogenous prostaglandins (PGs) have been reported to suppress or to promote the function of the primate corpus luteum in vitro and in vivo, but the role of endogenous ovarian prostaglandins in regulating luteal function during the menstrual cycle is unknown. Infusion (via osmotic pump) of the prostaglandin-synthesis inhibitor sodium meclofenamate into the corpus luteum, but not via the jugular vein, during the midluteal phase of the menstrual cycle resulted in a decline in progesterone levels and premature menses in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta). These results suggest that meclofenamate suppresses the production of an obligatory luteotropic prostaglandin or other metabolite of arachidonic acid. We were unable to confirm that ovarian prostaglandin synthesis was diminished during treatment, since we could not consistently measure a gradient in PGE or PGF₂(α) across the ovary. Dispersed cells from the macaque corpus luteum produced PGF₂(α) in vitro. Production was stimulated by exposure to arachidonic acid and was inhibited by meclofenamate and another prostaglandin-synthesis inhibitor, flurbiprofen. Although the two drugs were potent inhibitors of prostaglandin synthesis in vitro, intraluteal infusion of flurbiprofen in monkeys did not mimic the luteolytic effects of meclofenamate. These studies provide the first evidence of an obligatory luteotropic role for a metabolite of arachidonic acid during the primate luteal phase. However the data suggest that the luteolytic effect of meclofenamate in vivo is not mediated entirely by the inhibition of local prostaglandin synthesis. Further studies are needed to determine the mechanism(s) of meclofenamate-induced luteolysis and to identify the putative obligatory luteotropin.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectProstaglandins -- Synthesis.en_US
dc.subjectCorpus luteum.en_US
dc.subjectLuteal phase defects.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePhysiologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorStouffer, Richarden_US
dc.identifier.proquest8814273en_US
dc.identifier.oclc701248398en_US
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