A computer instructional support environment for information literacy: An experimental analysis.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184375
Title:
A computer instructional support environment for information literacy: An experimental analysis.
Author:
Hoeke, Marilynn Carol.
Issue Date:
1988
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
A pretest-treatment-posttest experimental comparison of three individual study support environments for an introductory Management Information Systems course indicated a positive trend in student achievement on structured examinations. The three environments studied include a textbook and class notes presentation method, and two Computer Instructional Support Environments (CISE), drill and practice, and tutorial. Of these, the drill and practice individual study support method displayed a consistently positive effect on examination achievement within each of seven MIS topics. Each topic examined could be classified on the basis of the level of learning objective, and further statistical analysis results indicate a strong correlation between the CISE drill and practice method and attaining a learning objective level of knowledge. Previous research in CISE implementation has been limited by the assumptions of single learning objective levels and single presentation methods, when in fact, the environment is highly complex. A series of experimental observations for introductory MIS topics, in which the learning objective level for each is identified, compares three support environments for individual study. Separate statistical analyses, performed on individual topics, indicate a higher level of achievement by student participants in the CISE Drill and Practice environment for score improvement and improvement in the time required to complete the posttest activity. Two ANOVA models examined the relationships between individual study support methods and topics within two classifications of learning objectives. These results indicate a strong relationship between study support method and learning objective level for text score improvement. The pretest-treatment-posttest experimental design used in this analysis may be replicated across additional topics within the Introductory MIS course to increase the number of topic observations in each learning objective classification. In addition, the experiment can be performed using the same topics to increase the sample size and further clarify the statistical results.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Computer science -- Computer-assisted instruction.; Computer-assisted instruction -- Research.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Business Administration; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Nunamaker, Jay F.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleA computer instructional support environment for information literacy: An experimental analysis.en_US
dc.creatorHoeke, Marilynn Carol.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHoeke, Marilynn Carol.en_US
dc.date.issued1988en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractA pretest-treatment-posttest experimental comparison of three individual study support environments for an introductory Management Information Systems course indicated a positive trend in student achievement on structured examinations. The three environments studied include a textbook and class notes presentation method, and two Computer Instructional Support Environments (CISE), drill and practice, and tutorial. Of these, the drill and practice individual study support method displayed a consistently positive effect on examination achievement within each of seven MIS topics. Each topic examined could be classified on the basis of the level of learning objective, and further statistical analysis results indicate a strong correlation between the CISE drill and practice method and attaining a learning objective level of knowledge. Previous research in CISE implementation has been limited by the assumptions of single learning objective levels and single presentation methods, when in fact, the environment is highly complex. A series of experimental observations for introductory MIS topics, in which the learning objective level for each is identified, compares three support environments for individual study. Separate statistical analyses, performed on individual topics, indicate a higher level of achievement by student participants in the CISE Drill and Practice environment for score improvement and improvement in the time required to complete the posttest activity. Two ANOVA models examined the relationships between individual study support methods and topics within two classifications of learning objectives. These results indicate a strong relationship between study support method and learning objective level for text score improvement. The pretest-treatment-posttest experimental design used in this analysis may be replicated across additional topics within the Introductory MIS course to increase the number of topic observations in each learning objective classification. In addition, the experiment can be performed using the same topics to increase the sample size and further clarify the statistical results.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectComputer science -- Computer-assisted instruction.en_US
dc.subjectComputer-assisted instruction -- Research.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineBusiness Administrationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorNunamaker, Jay F.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberEirich, Wayneen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8814244en_US
dc.identifier.oclc701105838en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.